High Gloss

2. Gagarin stools, £125 each, from Andrew Martin; 020 7225 5100.3. Eames DAR chair, £263, from Twentytwentyone; 020 7837 1900.4. Ming porcelain and PVC vase, £295, by Fredrikson Stallard; 020 7254 9933.5. Vintage salad bowl, £21, by Guzzini, from Forma House; 020 8646 9655.6. Rug #1 in black urethane, £1,000, from Fredrikson Stallard, as before.7. Louis side table, £195, by John Reeves, from Heal's; 020 7636 1666.8. Mabelle dining chair, £235, from Aram; 020 7557 7557.9. Sideboard, from a selection, by Cappellini, from Chaplins; 020 7323 6552.10. Spun table lamp, £405, by Sebastian Wrong for Flos, from SCP; 020 7739 1869, www.scp.co.uk.

HOT PRODUCTS
no data
GET IN TOUCH WITH US
you might like
no data
recommended articles
Blog
Dining Chair From a 2x4
Before I even realised the 2x4 competition was going on, I had a spare 2x4 and had been watching far too many of Paul Sellers' woodworking videos, which had filled my head with delusions of being a proper woodworker. It struck me that there are plenty of "rustic garden chair from a 2x4" type guides around but not many making something a bit more refined-looking. I wanted a project to practise my carpentry skills on so I thought why not see if I could make a decent-looking indoor chair from a single 2x4? Here's how I got on.The first step was to figure out a rough design for the chair and work out if I could actually get that much usable wood from one 2x4. Here in metric-land, rough softwood timber comes in pieces about 2440 x 95 x 45mm, roughly 8' x 1 3/4" x 3 3/4". When I talk about "2x2" or "2x1" I mean the resulting size from resawing that wood into halves or quarters, though it isn't that exact size in inches.The basic plan was to cut the wood into three sections: a 50cm piece I would resaw into two 2x2 for the front legs, a 90cm piece that would provide two 2x2 for the back and back legs, and a 100cm piece I would resaw into four 2x1 strips that would then form the rest of the frame- the seat sides, stretcher and back spindles/rails.I figured out that I could get three 30cm pieces, six 40cm pieces and three 20cm pieces which would let me build the frame of a reasonably sized chair. The third image here shows the cut list to provide those lengths.The part where I went totally off-piste was the back angle. The back of a dining chair should slope backwards at about 8 degrees, which sane people achieve by cutting a shape out of a larger piece of wood, but this would result in far too much waste. I had to figure out a way to take a single continuous 2x2 and introduce a shallow bend into the middle.I'm new to the whole chair anatomy thing- the final image shows the words I'm using for various parts of the chair, which I may well be using incorrectly but it beats calling them "vertical back part" and "horizontal back part".Step one was to cut the entire 2x4 into the lengths I wanted: 50cm, 90cm and 100cm. A tape measure, pencil and mitre saw made quick work of this.Once I had the lengths I needed I had to resaw them into thinner pieces. Any sane woodworker would use a table saw to do this, but I don't have a table saw so had to improvise. I fitted a 4 tooth-per-inch blade on the bandsaw as a general purpose blade can't cut this thickness of wood without clogging. I also clamped a feather board to the table and clamped both ends of the fence to try and keep it cutting as square as possible.It's important to get the cut in the middle of the wood so the two resulting pieces are the same size - to do this I made a short cut into one end, then measured the distance from the fence to the cut, and adjusted the position of the fence until the saw was going to leave the same amount of wood on both sides.When resawing long pieces of wood on a small bandsaw you'll end up with the weight of the board hanging off the far end, which is bad news. If possible, find an assistant to support the wood coming out of the cut to avoid having to reach around the blade. I wouldn't advise resawing this way, but if you do do it, pay attention and be safe!Once you've resawed to the width you need, cut the 2x1s down to the lengths from the cut list and you have your raw lengths ready for cleaning up.Cutting a thick piece of softwood on a cheap bandsaw with a coarse blade will probably result in wavy cuts. This job was no exception. I took the wavy wood over to a bench vise and planed down the cut surfaces until smooth. You could use a powered sander here instead of a plane, but be careful not to take off too much material.After dry fitting the back together to see how it looked, I began to feel like I was just creating another boxy square design without any of those decorative flourishes that set fine furniture apart from its rustic and flatpack cousins. Before I started assembling the chair I decided to:- Cut some cutouts from the spindles to make them more slender-looking- Cut a slight radius into the top and bottom railsTo make the cutouts on the spindles, I made a template out of a scrap of plywood, used this to draw the cut lines on the spindles and cut them out on the bandsaw. The template for the top and bottom curve on the rails could be drawn freehand but I cheated and cut this one on the laser cutter.I also clamped the three spindles together and sanded a slight radius into the ends with the nose of a belt sander, so they would be tapered slightly where they met the rails - this again makes them look a bit more slender, and also hides any slight misalignment as I was still honing my dowel-joint-making skills at this point.Continuing the little design touches, I decided to- Taper the bottom section of the legs down to a smaller "foot"- Chamfer the top parts of the legs into a pyramid so they don't just terminate in a square endTo chamfer the tops of the legs, I used a woodworking gauge to divide the top of each leg into thirds (like a tic-tac-toe board) and scribed a line 5mm down from the top edge, and cut the four bevels on the bandsaw.To taper the bottom of each leg, I needed to cut two wedges out on adjacent sides. To do this I had to mark and cut one wedge, then mark the second one on the cut face. Each wedge is 150mm x 15mm so the foot is about half the area of the leg which seemed to look like the right proportions.This part was done more as a personal challenge to myself and to see whether I could make the chair from a single 2x4 worth of wood. The sensible way to make a back leg with a bend in it would be to trace the outline on a piece of 2x4 wood and cut it out. I only had two straight 2x2s which I needed to introduce a bend into, so I decided to cut them at an angle and rotate one of the pieces, so I could glue them back together with a lap joint at an angle.The 90cm 2x2 wouldn't fit in the bandsaw and I couldn't reliably get a perfectly straight cut on it anyway. This is another part of the process which would have been much easier with a table saw. As it is, I had to clamp the 2x2 between two workbenches, and clamp a long straightedge to it at a 10 degree angle to guide the jigsaw. 10 degrees is more angle than I would have liked, but anything shallower would have made the cut impractically long - each cut was about 25cm long and took several minutes of painstaking jigsawing, but I ended up with a cut surface that was flat enough to glue up. These joints were the only ones that used screws, because just clamping them together resulted in the two halves sliding apart, so I drilled and countersunk two holes through each joint to accept wood screws that held the two halves in the right position while the glue dried.With all the pieces made, it was time to start assembling. The easiest way to assemble a chair of this shape is to glue the back together as one piece, and the front similarly, then attach the two parts of the frame together with the sides of the seat and stretchers. The first part to be assembled was the back. To make the dowel joints I'd drill two 28mm deep, 9mm diameter holes into the ends of the spindles and the sides of the rails, and glue a 50mm section of 9mm dowel into the joints. The holes were deeper than they needed to be to allow a little room for glue at the ends.Having done this the hard way, I'd recommend drilling the holes into the ends of the spindles, measuring their position and drilling the corresponding holes in the rails, because drilling accurately placed holes into the softwood end grain was tricky.Gluing the back together required a bit of ingenuity as I didn't have a single bar clamp long enough - I'd really recommend you figure this sort of thing out before starting as it's quite stressful trying to improvise clamping arrangements while the glue is drying!I also drilled the holes for the stretcher, but didn't glue it up on its own. I made sure to drill the holes in the ends of the side arms of the stretcher so they were pointing straight forward/back in the chair, which made assembling the frame much easier than if they were drilled straight into the ends.Right. Take a deep breath and mentally prepare yourself. Lay everything you need out where it's accessible: a glue pot, spreader stick, lots of paper towel for wiping up squeezeout, enough dowels of the appropriate lengths and all the frame pieces.Glue the holes in the stretcher, insert dowels and fit it together.Place the back of the chair on the workbench facing up, glue all the holes and insert dowels. Glue the protruding ends of these dowels, and fit the stretcher onto the lower set of dowels. Glue up the seat sides and fit them onto the upper dowels.Add glue to the exposed holes in the side parts you just added, insert and glue up the remaining dowels, and fit the front legs onto those. Take a breath. Make sure all the joints are fully pushed together with as little gap as you can manage - a little persuasion with a mallet can help out, but don't go wild on it. Set the chair upright on its legs and make sure it's not crooked or twisted. You can add a strap clamp or bar clamps to hold it all together while it dries.Admire the chair from all angles - this step is important.Once this was done, I grabbed a piece of plywood and jigsawed a seat to fit over the seat sides with corners cut out for the legs. The idea was to upholster this with fabric and upholstery foam (inspired by, naturally, Paul Sellers' video on how to upholster a chair seat which came out when I was half way through making this chair) but I ran out of time for the contest deadline so for now a seat pad will have to do. And I was trying to make something that didn't look like garden furniture...Despite all this, a piece of simple everyday furniture from scratch is definitely one of the more rewarding things I've made, and I'm sure I'll build more in future. Hopefully this goes to show just how far you can make a 2x4 go with some ingenuity and a healthy disregard of practical limitations :)
Dining Chair From a 2x4
Before I even realised the 2x4 competition was going on, I had a spare 2x4 and had been watching far too many of Paul Sellers' woodworking videos, which had filled my head with delusions of being a proper woodworker. It struck me that there are plenty of "rustic garden chair from a 2x4" type guides around but not many making something a bit more refined-looking. I wanted a project to practise my carpentry skills on so I thought why not see if I could make a decent-looking indoor chair from a single 2x4? Here's how I got on.The first step was to figure out a rough design for the chair and work out if I could actually get that much usable wood from one 2x4. Here in metric-land, rough softwood timber comes in pieces about 2440 x 95 x 45mm, roughly 8' x 1 3/4" x 3 3/4". When I talk about "2x2" or "2x1" I mean the resulting size from resawing that wood into halves or quarters, though it isn't that exact size in inches.The basic plan was to cut the wood into three sections: a 50cm piece I would resaw into two 2x2 for the front legs, a 90cm piece that would provide two 2x2 for the back and back legs, and a 100cm piece I would resaw into four 2x1 strips that would then form the rest of the frame- the seat sides, stretcher and back spindles/rails.I figured out that I could get three 30cm pieces, six 40cm pieces and three 20cm pieces which would let me build the frame of a reasonably sized chair. The third image here shows the cut list to provide those lengths.The part where I went totally off-piste was the back angle. The back of a dining chair should slope backwards at about 8 degrees, which sane people achieve by cutting a shape out of a larger piece of wood, but this would result in far too much waste. I had to figure out a way to take a single continuous 2x2 and introduce a shallow bend into the middle.I'm new to the whole chair anatomy thing- the final image shows the words I'm using for various parts of the chair, which I may well be using incorrectly but it beats calling them "vertical back part" and "horizontal back part".Step one was to cut the entire 2x4 into the lengths I wanted: 50cm, 90cm and 100cm. A tape measure, pencil and mitre saw made quick work of this.Once I had the lengths I needed I had to resaw them into thinner pieces. Any sane woodworker would use a table saw to do this, but I don't have a table saw so had to improvise. I fitted a 4 tooth-per-inch blade on the bandsaw as a general purpose blade can't cut this thickness of wood without clogging. I also clamped a feather board to the table and clamped both ends of the fence to try and keep it cutting as square as possible.It's important to get the cut in the middle of the wood so the two resulting pieces are the same size - to do this I made a short cut into one end, then measured the distance from the fence to the cut, and adjusted the position of the fence until the saw was going to leave the same amount of wood on both sides.When resawing long pieces of wood on a small bandsaw you'll end up with the weight of the board hanging off the far end, which is bad news. If possible, find an assistant to support the wood coming out of the cut to avoid having to reach around the blade. I wouldn't advise resawing this way, but if you do do it, pay attention and be safe!Once you've resawed to the width you need, cut the 2x1s down to the lengths from the cut list and you have your raw lengths ready for cleaning up.Cutting a thick piece of softwood on a cheap bandsaw with a coarse blade will probably result in wavy cuts. This job was no exception. I took the wavy wood over to a bench vise and planed down the cut surfaces until smooth. You could use a powered sander here instead of a plane, but be careful not to take off too much material.After dry fitting the back together to see how it looked, I began to feel like I was just creating another boxy square design without any of those decorative flourishes that set fine furniture apart from its rustic and flatpack cousins. Before I started assembling the chair I decided to:- Cut some cutouts from the spindles to make them more slender-looking- Cut a slight radius into the top and bottom railsTo make the cutouts on the spindles, I made a template out of a scrap of plywood, used this to draw the cut lines on the spindles and cut them out on the bandsaw. The template for the top and bottom curve on the rails could be drawn freehand but I cheated and cut this one on the laser cutter.I also clamped the three spindles together and sanded a slight radius into the ends with the nose of a belt sander, so they would be tapered slightly where they met the rails - this again makes them look a bit more slender, and also hides any slight misalignment as I was still honing my dowel-joint-making skills at this point.Continuing the little design touches, I decided to- Taper the bottom section of the legs down to a smaller "foot"- Chamfer the top parts of the legs into a pyramid so they don't just terminate in a square endTo chamfer the tops of the legs, I used a woodworking gauge to divide the top of each leg into thirds (like a tic-tac-toe board) and scribed a line 5mm down from the top edge, and cut the four bevels on the bandsaw.To taper the bottom of each leg, I needed to cut two wedges out on adjacent sides. To do this I had to mark and cut one wedge, then mark the second one on the cut face. Each wedge is 150mm x 15mm so the foot is about half the area of the leg which seemed to look like the right proportions.This part was done more as a personal challenge to myself and to see whether I could make the chair from a single 2x4 worth of wood. The sensible way to make a back leg with a bend in it would be to trace the outline on a piece of 2x4 wood and cut it out. I only had two straight 2x2s which I needed to introduce a bend into, so I decided to cut them at an angle and rotate one of the pieces, so I could glue them back together with a lap joint at an angle.The 90cm 2x2 wouldn't fit in the bandsaw and I couldn't reliably get a perfectly straight cut on it anyway. This is another part of the process which would have been much easier with a table saw. As it is, I had to clamp the 2x2 between two workbenches, and clamp a long straightedge to it at a 10 degree angle to guide the jigsaw. 10 degrees is more angle than I would have liked, but anything shallower would have made the cut impractically long - each cut was about 25cm long and took several minutes of painstaking jigsawing, but I ended up with a cut surface that was flat enough to glue up. These joints were the only ones that used screws, because just clamping them together resulted in the two halves sliding apart, so I drilled and countersunk two holes through each joint to accept wood screws that held the two halves in the right position while the glue dried.With all the pieces made, it was time to start assembling. The easiest way to assemble a chair of this shape is to glue the back together as one piece, and the front similarly, then attach the two parts of the frame together with the sides of the seat and stretchers. The first part to be assembled was the back. To make the dowel joints I'd drill two 28mm deep, 9mm diameter holes into the ends of the spindles and the sides of the rails, and glue a 50mm section of 9mm dowel into the joints. The holes were deeper than they needed to be to allow a little room for glue at the ends.Having done this the hard way, I'd recommend drilling the holes into the ends of the spindles, measuring their position and drilling the corresponding holes in the rails, because drilling accurately placed holes into the softwood end grain was tricky.Gluing the back together required a bit of ingenuity as I didn't have a single bar clamp long enough - I'd really recommend you figure this sort of thing out before starting as it's quite stressful trying to improvise clamping arrangements while the glue is drying!I also drilled the holes for the stretcher, but didn't glue it up on its own. I made sure to drill the holes in the ends of the side arms of the stretcher so they were pointing straight forward/back in the chair, which made assembling the frame much easier than if they were drilled straight into the ends.Right. Take a deep breath and mentally prepare yourself. Lay everything you need out where it's accessible: a glue pot, spreader stick, lots of paper towel for wiping up squeezeout, enough dowels of the appropriate lengths and all the frame pieces.Glue the holes in the stretcher, insert dowels and fit it together.Place the back of the chair on the workbench facing up, glue all the holes and insert dowels. Glue the protruding ends of these dowels, and fit the stretcher onto the lower set of dowels. Glue up the seat sides and fit them onto the upper dowels.Add glue to the exposed holes in the side parts you just added, insert and glue up the remaining dowels, and fit the front legs onto those. Take a breath. Make sure all the joints are fully pushed together with as little gap as you can manage - a little persuasion with a mallet can help out, but don't go wild on it. Set the chair upright on its legs and make sure it's not crooked or twisted. You can add a strap clamp or bar clamps to hold it all together while it dries.Admire the chair from all angles - this step is important.Once this was done, I grabbed a piece of plywood and jigsawed a seat to fit over the seat sides with corners cut out for the legs. The idea was to upholster this with fabric and upholstery foam (inspired by, naturally, Paul Sellers' video on how to upholster a chair seat which came out when I was half way through making this chair) but I ran out of time for the contest deadline so for now a seat pad will have to do. And I was trying to make something that didn't look like garden furniture...Despite all this, a piece of simple everyday furniture from scratch is definitely one of the more rewarding things I've made, and I'm sure I'll build more in future. Hopefully this goes to show just how far you can make a 2x4 go with some ingenuity and a healthy disregard of practical limitations :)
Nearly a Month After Son of Roselle Park Couple Drowns, Many Questions Remain Unanswered
Ryan Koranteng-Barnes was 2 years old and less than 3 feet tall, with one good hand. The pool he drowned in was 4 feet above ground with no ladder and no other way to climb in, relatives say.While authorities say the Roselle Park toddler's death appears accidental, Koranteng-Barnes' parents are convinced something else contributed to their son's drowning. They are asking for witnesses to step forward to help explain how their youngest son died in a neighbor's backyard on June 25."I've been searching for answers, and nobody wants to give me any," said Ebo Koranteng-Barnes, Ryan's father.The Union County Prosecutor's Office and the Roselle Park police have both said their investigation remains open, but they do not suspect foul play in the child's death."While it does not appear suspicious, the homicide task force is continuing to interview people, including potential witnesses, and is waiting on a report from the medical examiner's office," Prosecutor Theodore Romankow said.Ryan was playing with his older brother, Ferdinand, and his mother during a block party last month when he disappeared into a neighbor's backyard, his father said. The Koranteng-Barneses and the owners of the home where the child vanished - Tony and Ida Martins - searched frantically for the boy, finding him unconscious in the pool minutes later.Neighbors tried to revive Ryan, but he was pronounced dead at the scene, Koranteng-Barnes and police said.With his left hand deformed because of a birth defect, Ryan would not have been able to climb in by himself, his family said, and the pool did not have a ladder attached to it."I saw it with my naked eyes, the ladder was at least two feet away from the pool," Koranteng-Barnes said. "My son cannot even sit on a dining chair by himself."The Martins' pool should not have been filled either, because it had not been inspected by the town, according to Steve Greenstein, an attorney for the Koranteng-Barnes family.On June 2, Tony Martins was served with a municipal violation informing him the pool should not have been filled, according to a document provided by Greenstein.The child's father believes someone helped his son enter the pool, but Tony Martins said no one else was in the backyard."To me it was a tragic accident - there's no other way to explain it," he said.Koranteng-Barnes doesn't believe anyone intentionally tried to drown Ryan, but he's worried that investigators will simply close his son's case without providing the family any closure."It is their civic duty to tell me how my son got into the pool," Koranteng-Barnes said. "They have to prove it was an accident.":• No foul play suspected in drowning death of Roselle Park 2-year-old • 2-year-old boy drowns in Roselle Park pool
5 Designers You Didn't Know You Already Love
There's a certain style of minimalist interiors enjoying widespread popularity at the moment, particularly when it comes to the chairs we sit on. Unless you're a furniture history enthusiast, today's dining chairs and sofas might appear to epitomise contemporary living - but, in reality, a lot of what you're loving is merely lifted and reproduced from decades gone by.A perusal of New York's Museum of Modern Art's vintage interiors collection - or that of Paris' Pompidou Centre - today is not dissimilar to an afternoon spent browsing the homeware sections of your favourite high street stores. Here, you'll find world-renowned designer names you already adore but never knew.And so, when scouring Pinterest for your favourite styles, it helps to know your Thonet from your Eames or Bauhaus designs. You'll pay a pretty penny for the real deal, that's for sure, but if it's just the look you're after, there are plenty of vintage-inspired alternatives on the market - cultfurniture.com is your best bet online. Here are five designer names to add to your interiors vocabulary.In the 1950s, the American Eames brothers carved out a furniture niche that is now inescapable. "Getting the most of the best to the greatest number of people for the least" was their design philosophy.Most known for their Eames Lounge Chair, their fibreglass rocking chair and their bucket-style dining seats - white with the light wooden legs is the most popular - their creations have come back with a bang in the last five years. This duo became synonymous with mid-century modern furniture design during this era and, today, it's the work of the Eameses that's most often replicated. Vitra Eames Plastic Armchair, €473.10, and chairs, €380.47 each, from nest.co.ukFrom Austria, Thonet is most famous for his No. 14 Café Chair, typically referred to as the 'bistro chair' and one of the best-selling styles of the last 160 years. Introduced in 1859, this minimal bentwood shape with an arc of rounded wood at the back became hot property in the 1920s and '30s. The original chair was made using a unique steam-bending technology that took years to master. Most popular in cafés and restaurants to date, the No. 14 is fast becoming the top choice for dining chairs at home as we collectively shift away from the 'modern' styles that dominated the first decade of the 21st century. You'll also find the Thonet No. 14 chair at a lot of weddings; it's creeping up behind the Italian Chiavari chair in terms of formal- occasion popularity. Thonet style chair, €70.80, cultfurniture.comThe French designer's name you certainly won't be familiar with; the Tolix chair style, you definitely will. It was originally designed by Pauchard in 1934, after discovering that sheet metal could be dipped in molten zinc to prevent rusting but it wasn't until 1956 that the Tolix we see everywhere today was tweaked to perfection.These were conceived as all-weather chairs, perfect for outdoor cafés, and they were particularly popular because you could stack 25 chairs to a height of 2.3 metres. You'll find them in restaurants, bars and hospitals, but today, they're becoming more common in the home. Pauchard-style stool, €49.60, cultfurniture.comBauhaus is not a person but an actual school of design in Germany that remains incredibly influential to this day. Many of the students' creations are described simply as 'Bauhaus', but a whole host of significant designers earned their stripes here. Marcel Breuer was one of particular prominence, designing the recognisable Bauhaus Wasilly Chair. And Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and partner Lilly Reich designed the Barcelona Chair; a piece that, in 1929, would plant the seed for the forthcoming mid-century modern furniture movement. From 1923 to 1933, with founder Walter Gropius at the helm, the Bauhaus school was responsible for some of the most iconic furniture pieces to date. In fact, you can probably thank the school of Bauhaus for today's industrial-looking interiors as they sought to showcase the mechanics behind a piece of furniture, as opposed to hiding it. They've even been credited as the design inspiration behind many of Apple's technological offerings. As relevant today as they were back then, these guys were all about the merging of style and function. Bauhaus became known for chairs and geometric nesting tables that were timeless and futuristic - often composed of wood, leather, metal and glass.Barcelona Chair, €947, popfurniture.comHailing from Denmark, Wegner was one of the most celebrated furniture designers to emerge in the mid-20th century and is considered responsible for the Danish Modern Movement of the 1950s and '60s that's still adored today. His most famous piece is without a doubt the Wishbone Chair, which remains as popular today as when it first took hold in 1949. The chair is still referred to as a triumph of craftsmanship, with its characteristic Y-shaped back. It's an ultra-comfortable dining chair (or breakfast bar stool) with a simple, clean design. Interestingly, though it appears minimal to the eye, there were more than 100 steps involved in the process of the original chair. Designed for Carl Hansen & Son in 1949, it's available today. Carl Hansen Wishbone Chair, currently reduced to €759 at Arnotts, arnotts.ieOther designs to look out for are Noguchi's coffee table, George Nelson's desk, Florence Knoll's sofa and Arne Jacobsen's Egg Chair. Their eye for sleek shapes and interesting detail continues to influence what we have in our homes well into the 21st century.Weekend Magazine
Bunkie Board Instead of Bed Slats with an Ikea MALM Platform Bed?
Are you making your own?, my son-in-law did that, the same as it sounds like you want, it worked out Great. Good Luck.1. How can i make a nice platform bed for cheap?Get up early on Saturday morning and go to garage sales. Every thing you need is there and cheap, a bed your looking for $20 maybe a little more, I have found some really nice things. As time goes buy and you can afford what you want, recycle and have your own sale!2. What kind of wood is the best and most inexpensive to use for building a platform bed for a california king?Pine or Douglass Fir3. I am working on a platform bed? Where can I buy oversize plywood? At least 60"X80"?if you have a good lumber yard nearby, you can special order there,99 ....they are called 'blows' if all else fails for you, purchase, 2 sheets of 1 1/8" T & G 4'x8' and glue & clamp them together and saw to desired dimensions.4. Does anyone here have a platform bed?My best friend has one and they hurt their shins. I also looked at a few at rooms to go and I banged my shin5. How To Build A Twin Platform BedWe have a guest that will be staying the night, a very messy guest room, and a twin mattress ... on the floor. I decided to get busy and Build A Twin Platform Bed with the thought that one of our kids could use it when they are off at college, renting a room off campus. Eventually, I would like to have a queen size bed in the guest room but this makes sense for now! This twin platform bed was pretty simple and inexpensive to build. It needed to be easy to disassemble so it could be hauled around easily and it needed to be inexpensive because ... this is not meant to be a family heirloom. Nope! It has a purpose to serve on a budget! This post contains affiliate links. When you purchase through an affiliate link, we receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. Disclosure. Our twin size mattress dimensions are 37-1/2 x 73-1/2 x 11 and I built this bed to fit those dimensions. Adjust your cuts to accommodate your mattress size. Note: My cuts are 2-1/2 shorter than our mattress size. This is because the mattress partially sits on top of the 4 x 4 legs. if you choose not to use casters, adjust the cut of the legs. Our twin mattress has a hard bottom and needed less slats than our Naturepedic mattress did. How To Assemble The Twin Platform Bed This bed is actually pretty simple to build! Make your cuts, according to your mattress size, and sand each piece with 120 grit sand paper. With the Kreg Jig, drill three pocket holes in each end of your headboard and footboard panel. Pay attention to what side of the board you want to be visible and make the pocket holes on the opposite side. Next, attach the headboard and footboard panels to the legs with 2-1/2 pocket hole screws. I placed a 1 x 4 under each end of the panel so the panel would sit back a bit from the 4 x 4 leg instead of being flush. The top of the panel and the top of the legs are flush. The next picture will show what I mean! The headboard and footboard assembled. Pretty basic, right? Then, attach the bed rail hooks on each 4 x 4 leg. I attached mine 2-1/2 from the top and as close to the inside edge that I could, in order to leave room for the side rail. Oh my goodness! These are non-mortise bed rail hooks! I struggled with the mortise bed rail hooks I used on our King Size Farmhouse Bed so I was pretty stoked to find these bed rail hooks! Now it was time to attach the bed slat supports. To do this, I laid the 2 x 4 on the inside of the 2 x 10 side rail and placed my 2 x 2 on top so I would know where to attach the 2 x 4. We want the mattress to sit right on top of this platform bed. I used Kreg Clamps and 2-1/2 Deck Plus Screws to attach the bed slat supports. This part was a bit tricky. The bed rail hooks needed to be lined up just right so the bed rail would sit flush with the headboard and footboard. I laid the footboard and headboard on the ground with the hooks attached. Then, I had my husband hold the side rails up against it, where I wanted it to be, and marked the screw holes. I am glad I did it this way because the hooks sit back a bit on the bed rail in order to sit flush. I would not have known that if I had only measured the correct height. The bed rails were pretty easy to attach and it was all flush ... enough! I used Homemade Stain for my Twin Bed. After the bed was stained, I took it apart, laid the pieces on sawhorses, and finished each piece with a coat of wax. I then attached a caster wheel to each leg. After the wax was dry, I took the bed pieces into the guest room and reassembled it. This is where you would measure the inside dimension of your bed so you can cut your bed slats the proper width. I placed the bed slats and side rail blocks where they needed to go. Next, I attached each block to the side rail support by pre-drilling a hole and then used one self-sinking screw in each block. This was a bit tedious as I used my Kreg Clamp on each block to keep it from moving. We are happy with this simple Twin Platform Bed! It was easy and inexpensive to build and should be a good thing to have around when the kids say goodbye to dorm life and rent a room, when they are off at college. Of course, we are also quite happy that our guest will not have to sleep on a mattress, on the floor. How To Make Wood Stain With Common Household Products Fun DIY House Projects You Can Do Too!
Leesa's Sapira Mattress Has Springs but still Comes in a Box
Mattress-in-a-box companies, from Tuft & Needle to Casper, ship foam and latex mattresses to your door for under $900 for a queen size. Most offer a single type, with dimensions being the only thing you can choose from. Leesa is a member of that club, but today it's branching but with a new brand called Sapira. It's supposed to offer a more luxurious mattress that is a hybrid of springs and foam.The queen costs $1,475, $585 more than the 10-inch-thick, all-foam Leesa. It's an inch thicker, too, with a 1.5-inch top layer of high-density foam; a 1.5-inch layer of memory foam; and steel pocket springs in between two, 1-inch layers of stabilizing foam. Pocket springs are encased in their own cloth pouch. With traditional innerspring mattresses, the coils are tied together, so when you lie down, your weight gets transferred across the bed. That means that, in general, you'll be less likely to feel your partner tossing and turning with the pocket spring variety.Related:Nightingale smart home sleep system masks both indoor and outdoor noisesI tried the Sapira out for a couple of nights, and I found this to be very true. Pushing down on one side of the bed left the other side unaffected. I pressed the mattress down about six inches away from my sleeping cat, and he didn't stir.The overall experience of getting the Sapira is pretty similar to the Leesa one. It arrives at your door all boxed up and compressed, and you slice through a few layers of plastic to let it plump up. You'll get 100 days to try out the mattress, and the company will pick it up if you decide not to keep it within that time frame.The Sapira is definitely a dense mattress. The full-size mattress weighs in at 98 pounds, according to the shipping label. Even though it's only an added inch, the Sapira seems thicker than the Leesa. The top layer of foam is certainly soft, but overall the mattress feels pretty firm.Other brands like Helix and Luma have been offering these "hybrid" foam and spring mattresses for a while, and by offering it as a separate, more luxury-minded brand, Leesa can offer another option beyond its single-type-of-firmness mattress.
My Minimalist Wardrobe
Minimalism is very important to me, and not just because of the simplicity of it all. It has helped me distance myself from the world of social conformity, build better relationships, and lessen my addiction to social media. I spend more time getting my work done and less time worrying about whether or not I've got my hands on this season's mom jeans. For those of you who are not really sure what minimalism is beyond owning less things, let me explain. Minimalism goes far past "Less is more." It's a way of limiting yourself to the things that actually provide use, are needed, and improve your life. By owning only what we need, we are abandoning the consumerism our society has adopted and putting that energy toward the things that truly matter. Our family, friends, career, education, and goals become more important than the stuff we've gathered over the years. To cleanse a space is to cleanse a mind.I desire to keep my space simple and clean, yet I want it to be filled with art and nice clothing. I am not a fan of the "plain white button down as a daily outfit" look. I want some variety, but with a limitation on the amount. Here is how I do it.When I began, I easily had 200 pieces of clothing. When I say "pieces of clothing," I include shirts, pants, coats, dresses, scarves, shoes, and bags or purses. One day when I was hanging up clothes, my closet made a very unfriendly creaking sound, and as soon as I turned to investigate, the entire rack was coming off the wall. It was time to let go.As I started getting rid of things, I realized how little I actually wore any of the clothes I owned. I would rotate the same ten tops and three jeans and I only wore one pair of shoes among the eleven pairs I owned. And on top of the massive amount of clothing in my closet, I had a 6-drawer dresser each full of the clothes I never wore. I owned at least five bags, but I could not give you the actual amount because I only ever carried one and the rest meant nothing to me.I follow the general rule that if it does not provide meaning or use in my life, get rid of it. I've been able to follow this… mostly. I still have a hard time getting rid of clothing I do not even want if it still has some use left. I also feel the overwhelming urge to trash everything until I only own two shirts, one pair of pants, and a pair of shoes. Unfortunately, this is not realistic for someone who enjoys a variety and would not want to be caught dead wearing the same thing two days in a row. So, I've gone down to the absolute basics for my own personal style. The climate in my area gets both very hot and very cold, so I have to have a decent amount of clothes for each season. Many days, it starts off cold in the morning and is hot by midday, so I must have clothing that's good for layering. I decided that I had to have at least one outfit for interviews and professional occasions as well as one dress for formal family events. For the most part, deciding what I needed was easy. But the most difficult decisions lied with choosing which items to keep and which to toss out. Every once in a while I make a log of all the clothing I own, track the newest additions as well as the donations, and make sure I am limiting myself to a decent amount of clothing, not going overboard in either direction. Here's what my minimalist closet looks like:Tops: Two flannel shirts, three sweaters, one long-sleeve top, three t-shirts, one blouse, and one gray tank top. Total=11 items.Bottoms: one pair of high-rise jeans, one pair low-rise, one pair of leggings. Total=3 items. Coats: One petticoat, one denim jacket, one blazer, one raincoat, two summer jackets, one work-out jacket. Total=7 items.Shoes: One pair of work shoes, one pair oxfords, two pairs of sneakers, one pair of sandals, one pair of boots. Total=6 items.Dresses: One t-shirt dress, one formal dress, one summer dress. Total=3 items. Accessories: 3 winter scarves, one purse, one book bag. Total=5 items.Overall closet total=35 items.This closet suits me well a good 98% of the time. I find myself occasionally worried about what to wear because I do allow myself to have more options than I probably should. But like I said, I am young! I like options! I like colors! It's okay to be a minimalist and not want stark white pressed shirts only! Color is good. Color is happy. Options are okay.And that's my minimalist wardrobe! My journey began in the beginning of February 2017 and this is where I've gotten in the last year. Much of my inspiration has drawn from the one and only duo The Minimalists. If you have not seen their documentary on Netflix, give it a watch, and you might find it as life changing as I did!Marnie is an LGBTQ poet and storyteller from North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Follow Marnie on tumblr for unpublished poems, prose, and short stories. Purchase Marnie's poetry book "a black and white rainbow" about love, loss, and coming out here.whats the one item of clothing in your wardrobe you'll never throw out ?all of my abercrombie and hollister polos...in every color=]]
no data

KingBird Home Furniture