Know About and so to Bed,an Introduction to and so to Bed

An Introduction to and so to bed

A garden square is a type of communal garden in an urban area wholly or substantially surrounded by buildings and, commonly, continues to be applied to public and private parks formed after such a garden becomes accessible to the public at large. The archetypal garden square is surrounded by tall terraced houses and other types of townhouse. It is subtly distinguished from a public-access version throughout the existence of the square the town square. Due to its inherent private history it may have a pattern of dedicated footpaths and tends to have considerably more plants than hard surfaces and/or large monuments

Occurrence of and so to bed

EuropeUnited KingdomLondon is famous for them; they are described as one of the glories of the capital. Many were built or rebuilt during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, at the height of Georgian architecture, and are surrounded by elegant townhouses. Large projects, such as the Bedford Estate, included garden squares in their development. The Notting Hill and Bloomsbury neighbourhoods both have many garden squares, with the former mostly still restricted to residents, and the latter open to all. Other UK cities prominent in the Georgian era such as Edinburgh, Bath, Bristol and Leeds have several garden squares.

Householders with access to a private garden square are commonly required to pay a maintenance levy. Normally the charge is set annually by a garden committee.

Sometimes private garden squares are opened to the public, such as during Open Garden Squares Weekend.

FranceIn ParisPrivately owned squares which survived the decades after the French Revolution and 19th century Haussmann's renovation of Paris include the Place des Vosges and Square des pinettes in Paris. It was a fashionable and expensive square to live in during the 17th and 18th centuries, and one of the central reasons that Le Marais district became so fashionable for French nobility. It was inaugurated in 1612 with a grand carrousel to celebrate the engagement of Louis XIII to Anne of Austria and is a prototype of the residential squares of European cities that were to come. What was new about the Place Royale as it was known in 1612 was that the house fronts were all built to the same design, probably by Baptiste du Cerceau.

In town squares, similarly green but publicly accessible from the outset, is the Square Ren Viviani. Gardens substantially cover a few of the famous Places in the capital; instead the majority are paved and replete with profoundly hard materials such as Place de la Concorde. Inspired by ecological interests and a 21st-century focus on pollution mitigation, an increasing number of the Places in Paris today many have a focal tree, or surrounding raised flower beds/and or rows of trees such as the Place de la Rpublique.

The enclosed garden terraces (French: jardins en terrain) and courtyards (French: cours) of some French former palaces have resulted in redevelopments into spaces equivalent to garden squares. The same former single-owner scenario applies to at least one garden square in London (Coleridge Square).

Outside of ParisGrandiose instances of garden-use town squares are a part of many French cities, others opt for solid material town squares.

BelgiumThe Square de Mees and Square Orban are notable examples in Brussels.

IrelandDublin has several Georgian examples, including Merrion Square, Fitzwilliam Square, Mountjoy Square, St Stephens Green and Parnell Square.

The AmericasUnited StatesPerhaps the most famous garden square in the United States is Gramercy Park in southern Midtown Manhattan. Famously, it has remained private and gated throughout its existence; possession of a key to the park is a jealously guarded privilege.

The tradition of fee simple land ownership in American cities has made collective amenities such as garden squares comparatively rare. Very few subdividers and developers included them in plats during the 19th century, with notable exceptions below.

Rittenhouse Square in the Center City, Philadelphia encases a public garden, one of the five original open-space parks planned by William Penn and his surveyor Thomas Holme during the late 17th century. It was first named Southwest Square.

Nearby Fitler Square is a similar garden square named for late 19th century Philadelphia mayor Edwin Henry Fitler shortly after his death in 1896. The Square, cared for through a public private partnership between the Department of Parks and Recreation and the Fitler Square Improvement Association.

In Boston tens of squares exist, some having a mainly residential use.

The Kingstowne development in Fairfax County, Virginia, near Washington, DC, contains several townhouse complexes built around garden squares.

Propagation of and so to bed

At their conception in the early 17th century each such garden was a private communal amenity for the residents of the overlooking houses akin to a garden courtyard within a palace or community. Such community courtyards date back to at least Ur in 2000 BC where two-storey houses were built of fired brick around an open square. Kitchen, working, and public spaces were located on the ground floor, with private rooms located upstairs.

The conversion of many during the 20th century into public parks renders those garden squares a subset of town squares, that is those with a garden square heritage. Some remain private they may open intermittently or regularly but many today are open to the public at least during part of every day, serving as small parks.

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An Introduction to and so to bedDemonax (Greek: , Dmnax, gen.: ; c. AD 70 c. 170) was a Greek Cynic philosopher. Born in Cyprus, he moved to Athens, where his wisdom, and his skill in solving disputes, earned him the admiration of the citizens. He taught Lucian, who wrote a Life of Demonax in praise of his teacher. When he died he received a magnificent public funeral.Life of and so to bedThe only source known for the life of Demonax is Lucian, who describes Demonax in glowing terms, in contrast to the disreputable Cynics whom Lucian reviled. He is not mentioned by any other contemporary writer. He is mentioned in the 5th century by Eunapius, but only because he knows of him from Lucian's work. It is possible, therefore, that Demonax is a character invented by Lucian. There are, however, some sayings attributed to Demonax found in anthologies compiled by later writers which are not found in Lucian's work.Demonax was born c. 70 AD, in Cyprus, where he belonged to an influential family. He was led by a love of philosophy to become a philosopher. He was taught by the best philosophers of the day, including Agathobulus, Demetrius, and Epictetus. He eventually moved to Athens, where he seems initially to have offended the citizens, but eventually he came to be regarded with reverence for his resolute character:To a natural impulse towards the good, an innate yearning for philosophy which manifested itself in childish years, that he owed his superiority to all the things that ordinary men pursue. He took independence and candour for his guiding principles, lived himself an upright, wholesome, irreproachable life, and exhibited to all who saw or heard him the model of his own disposition and philosophic sincerity.He is described as a peace-maker, able to bring harmony between husband and wife, and to solve disputes between brothers. Lucian compares him to both Socrates and Diogenes, and when Demonax was asked which philosophers he preferred, he is said to have replied, "I admire them all; Socrates I revere, Diogenes I admire, Aristippus I love."When Demonax was once asked why he never sacrificed to Athena, he replied, "he did not sacrifice to Athena, because she could not want his offerings." Similarly, he avoided initiation into the Eleusian Mysteries, saying, "if the mysteries were bad, no one ought to be initiated; if good, they should be divulged to everybody."He apparently lived to be nearly a hundred, by which time the Athenians loved him dearly:Not Athens only, but all Greece was so in love with him that as he passed the great would give him place and there would be a general hush. Towards the end of his long life he would go uninvited into the first house that offered, and there get his dinner and his bed, the household regarding it as the visit of some heavenly being which brought them a blessing. When they saw him go by, the baker-wives would contend for the honour of supplying him, and a happy woman was the actual donor. Children too used to call him father, and bring him offerings of fruit.He was said to have died (c. 170 AD) by starving himself, and the Athenians gave him a magnificent public funeral.The crater Demonax on the Moon is named after him. Demonax is also a genus of longicorn beetles (Cerambycidae), characterised in part by possessing several spines on their antennae.Lucian's Life of Demonax of and so to bedMost of Lucian's account of Demonax is filled with pithy sayings in order to illustrate Demonax's wit. Long lists of anecdotes (known as chreia), were often collected concerning philosophers, especially Cynic philosophers, in order to demonstrate their character and wit:When he once had a winter voyage to make, a friend asked how he liked the thought of being capsized and becoming food for fishes. "I should be very unreasonable to mind giving them a meal, considering how many they have given me."To a rhetorician who had given a very poor declamation he recommended constant practice. "Why, I am always practising to myself," said the man. "Ah, that accounts for it; you are accustomed to such a foolish audience."When someone asked him who he thinks as a truly happy man, he replied "the truly happy man is the free man. I'm talking about the one who neither hopes nor fears anything."
Knowledge About and so to Bed | Family of and so to Bed
Family of and so to bedGlynne married firstly Frances Squib, eldest daughter of Arthur Squib. Glynne purchased Henley Manor, Normandy, Surrey from Squib, whom he assisted through his influence to the positions of Clarenceux Herald and Teller of the Exchequer. They had the following children, 2 sons & 5 daughters:Sir William Glynne, 1st BaronetThomas, unmarried, s.p.Frances, died an infantJane, wife of Sir Robert Williams,Bt., of Penrhyn, Carnarvonshire, nephew & heir of John, Archbishop of York & Lord-Keeper of the Great Seal of EnglandMargaret, died an infantAnne, wife of Sir John Evelyn, Bt., of Lee Place, Godstone, SurreyFrances, wife of William Campion (16391702) of Combwell, Goudhurst, Kent, eldest son of Sir William Campion (d.1648, siege of Colchester) of Danny Park, Hurstpierpoint, Sussex, and Grace, eldest da. of Sir Thomas Parker of Ratton in Willingdon.He married secondly Anne Manning, daughter. & co-heiress of John Manning of London & Cralle, Sussex, widow of Sir Thomas Lawley, Bt., of Cornwall.They had the following children:John Glynne, of Henley Park, Surrey, who m. Dorothy, da. of Francis Tylney of Tylney Hall, Rotherwick, Hants. They had 2 daughters, Elizabeth, who died unmarried and Dorothy, who married Sir Richard Child, Bt., later 1st Earl Tylney. John was educated at Hart Hall, Oxon. where he matriculated on 16 November 1666, aged 16. He entered Lincoln's Inn. John purchased Pirbright Manor, Surrey, from Francis, Lord Montagu in 1677 and sold Henley Manor, Surrey, to Frederick Tylney on 20 October 1679.Mary, wife of Sir Stephen Anderson of Eyeworth, Beds.------Early background of and so to bedOne of eleven children, Hemming was born in Los Angeles, California on March 1, 1937. He attended El Monte Union High School in California before joining the United States Marine Corps in 1954.Hemming left the Marines in October 1958 and the following year traveled to Cuba where he gave help to Fidel Castro and his revolutionary forces. In January 1959 Hemming met Lee Harvey Oswald at the Atsugi Naval Air Station in Japan. Hemming complained that Oswald boasted too much about his inside knowledge. For instance, upon their first meeting; Oswald tried to impress Hemming by showing off how much he knew about Hemming's background and mission - somebody in an intelligence capacity had briefed Lee Harvey Oswald, and Oswald sort of teased Hemming with this information. So, Hemming did not particularly enjoy the company of Oswald from the start.Like many young Americans, including Frank Sturgis, David Ferrie and Harry Dean, Hemming joined an American effort to overthrow the Batista regime through the efforts of Fidel Castro. When Castro proved to be a Communist, and subjected some Americans to firing squads, most Americans "switched sides" and this included Gerry Patrick Hemming. who, in 1961, established Interpen as a means to attack and weaken the Castro regime. Other members of Interpen reportedly included Loran Hall, Roy Hargraves, William Seymour, Lawrence Howard, Steve Wilson, Howard K. Davis, Edwin Collins, James Arthur Lewis, Dennis Harber, Bill Dempsey, Dick Whatley, Ramigo Arce, Ronald Augustinovich, Joe Garman, Edmund Kolby, Ralph Schlafter, Manuel Aguilar and Oscar Del Pinto.------Lakenheath Fen RSPB reserve of and so to bedLakenheath Fen RSPB reserve is located on the Norfolk/Suffolk border in England, between Lakenheath and Hockwold cum Wilton adjacent to Lakenheath railway station.Until 1995, when purchased by the RSPB, the land now forming the reserve was heavily farmed arable land. Since then, the 740-acre (3.0km2) site has been turned back into the reed beds and grazing marshes that would once have been common in the area. To achieve this, over 2 km of ditches were re-shaped with shallow sloping sides so as to encourage reed growth and to provide feeding areas, particularly suited to great bitterns. A number of sluices were installed to enable water levels to be controlled. In addition to the existing ditches, over 4 km of water channels were dug to re-circulate water around the site.Despite being created fairly recently, Lakenheath Fen is a haven for wildlife, and the number of birds seen at the reserve has increased significantly. The number of Eurasian reed warblers rose from four pairs in 1995 to 355 pairs in 2002. Reed buntings have increased from 6 to 87 pairs during the same period. Two pairs of western marsh harriers nested for the first time in newly created reed in 2002. Great crested grebes and little grebes are breeding on the meres, and water rails have nested in the new reeds. Bearded tits have stayed on the reserve throughout the winter, as have bitterns. Common cranes have been found to be breeding at the fen for what is believed to be the first time in 400 years.------Society of and so to bedThe Vangchhia tribe is native to this village. Vangchhia is the name of one of the eleven sub-tribes of Mizoram. They along with genealogically related clans like the Khawlhring, Pautu, Saivate, etc. form the greater Faihriem group of clans. They trace their descent from Chunthang, the son of Berhva. Traditions maintain that Chunthang was a very good man, and his good character earned him the hands of the Biete princess, Lalzaii. However, the couple could not nurture any child to maturity. The offspring out of the wedlock died at infancy. One night, in his dream he was told that the next child should be arranged to be born in another village and the child will survive. So, when the time for delivery of the next child came, the mother was taken to the village of the Thiek clan where she delivered a healthy boy. As the boy was born in another village, he was named 'Khualhring'. The boy later on became the progenitor of the Khawlhring clan. When the time for the next child came, Chunthang was again told to arrange for the child to be kept below the 'vang' tree near their house to ensure his survival. It was done so, and the child survived. The child was named 'Vangsie' or Vangchhia, indicating his first bed below the tree. Later, his descendants came to be known by that name. There are still Vangchhia with royal blood in them but records have been lost in time------Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale of and so to bedThe unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) is used to follow the longitudinal course of Parkinson's disease. The UPD rating scale is the most commonly used scale in the clinical study of Parkinson's disease.The UPDRS is made up of these sections:Part I: evaluation of mentation, behavior, and moodPart II: self-evaluation of the activities of daily life (ADLs) including speech, swallowing, handwriting, dressing, hygiene, falling, salivating, turning in bed, walking, and cutting foodPart III: clinician-scored monitored motor evaluationPart IV: complications of therapyPart V: Hoehn and Yahr staging of severity of Parkinson's diseasePart VI: Schwab and England ADL scaleThese are evaluated by interview and clinical observation. Some sections require multiple grades assigned to each extremity.Clinicians and researchers alike use the UPDRS and the motor section in particular to follow the progression of a person's Parkinson's disease. Scientific researchers use it to measure benefits from a given therapy in a more unified and accepted rating system. Neurologists also use it in clinical practice to follow the progression of their patients' symptoms in a more objective manner.Following the UPDRS scores over time provides insight into the patient's disease progression. For instance Michael J. Fox's symptoms started with a slight tremor, so his motor score would have been less than 10. For most patients, the "mentation, behavior and mood" scores increase later in the disease, but a subset exists for whom those symptoms develop early on.------Fancy Dress Party of and so to bedThe Fancy Dress Party was a political party in England. It was formed in 1979 as a frivolous alternative to the mainstream electoral parties, and can be seen as a forerunner of the more prominent Official Monster Raving Loony Party.Candidates stood in the 1979 general election, with John Beddoes being nominated in Dartford. Other Fancy Dress Party candidates stood in Dartford in each of the general elections in 1983, 1987, 1992, 1997 and 2001, and the party remained on the register of political parties until 2017.John 'Ernie' Crockford was the Fancy Dress Party's candidate for the 2010 general election. Keynote manifestos include rapidly building new schools using revolutionary inflatable classrooms making it easier for delinquent pupils to let the entire school down, reducing class sizes to 3'x2'6" and the abolition of student top-up fees; students should be entitled to full pints the same as everyone else.Some more policies included:Equip all Police Stations with state of the art lavatories so that, whatever the crime, the police will always have something to go on.Increase prison sentences to at least 20 words.Double police numbers; in future, PC49 will be known as PC98.Add spelling to the national kricklumPut an end to the dumbing-down of exams by replacing A-levels with jolly hard colouring tests.Put an end to secondary school classes of over 40 by only accepting children of under 39 years of age.Make cycling more attractive by banning the obese from wearing cycle shorts.Reduce Britain's carbon footprint by introducing solar-powered sun beds.Use a smaller font size to automatically reduce the unemployment statistics.------Douglas Lake Member of and so to bedThe Douglas Lake Member is a geologic unit of member rank of the Lenoir Limestone that overlies the Mascot Dolomite and underlies typical nodular member of the Lenoir Limestone in Douglas Lake, Tennessee, region. The Douglas Lake Member is composed of a diverse set or sedimentary rocks, including rubble conglomerate, chert conglomerate, and black dolomite. The chert conglomerate overlies the rubble conglomerate and both of which fill prehistoric sinkholes, called paleokarst, developed in upper surface of the Mascot Dolomite. Up to 10 meters (33ft) of black, fine-grained, thick-bedded dolomite fill two large, prehistoric sinkholes and grade upward almost imperceptibly into Lenoir Limestone. The type locality of the Douglas Lake Member lies on the north shore of Douglas Lake, 2.4 kilometers (1.5mi) northeast of Douglas Dam, Jefferson County. Such paleokarst depressions fills are common throughout this region. They are generally included in the Lenoir Limestone as the Douglas Lake Member.At Douglas Dam, the Douglas Lake Member consists of 37 meters (121ft) of volcanic ash, conglomerate and shale and / or shaly dolomite that fill a paleokarst depression developed in the Mascot Dolomite. This exposure of the Douglas Lake Member was named the 33 beds in 1944 In 1955, the 33 beds were assigned to the Douglas Lake Member of the Lenoir Limestone. The 33 beds were completely excavated for construction of Douglas Dam by the Tennessee Valley Authority in 1942, but yielded articulated arthropod fossils including Chasmataspsis and Douglasiocaris. Fossil plant compressions from this unit reveal the variety of non-vascular plants which lived on land before Silurian evolution of vascular land plants .
Know About and so to Bed | an Introduction to and so to Bed
An Introduction to and so to bedThe Supreme Court decision in Illinois Central Railroad v. Illinois, 146 U.S. 387 (1892), reaffirmed that each state in its sovereign capacity holds permanent title to all submerged lands within its borders and holds these lands in public trust. This is a foundational case for the public trust doctrine. The Supreme Court held a four to three split decision that the State of Illinois did not possess the authority to grant fee title to submerged lands held in the public trust as navigable watersDecision of and so to bedMajority Opinion of the CourtWriting for the majority, Justice Field affirmed the lower court's holding that the state held title to the lakebed. Field found that Illinois lacked the authority to grant title to submerged lands held in the public trust with two exceptions for grants not impairing the public interest and grants that actually improved the public trust. But neither exception was found to apply in this case and therefore the railroad did not possess title.Justice Field expressed the doctrine of public trust as follows:"It is the settled law of this country that the ownership of and dominion and sovereignty over lands covered by tide waters, within the limits of the several states, belong to the respective states within which they are found, with the consequent right to use or dispose of any portion thereof, when that can be done without substantial impairment of the interest of the public in the waters, and subject always to the paramount right of congress to control their navigation so far as may be necessary for the regulation of commerce with foreign nations and among the states"Justice Field determined that the public trust doctrine applies to the Great Lakes, despite the fact that they are not subject to the ebb and flow of the tides. Initially, the United States adopted English Common law which limited the definition of navigable waters to those that were subject to the ebb and flow of the tides. In the United States the tidal requirement was removed because many rivers can be navigated for great distances by large commercial vessels. Great Lakes, while not subject to the tides, are the conduit of a great deal of transnational and interstate commerce, and it was this value the common law sought to protect in the public trust doctrine. The public trust doctrine limits private property rights to lands submerged by navigable waters. The Great Lakes are owned in common to be preserved for the common good, and no private encroachment is allowed.Justice Field argued that the 1869 grant Illinois made to Illinois Central Railroad was merely a grant of the right to lay track, not a transfer of title to a portion of the lakebed. The grant was expressly limited to this purpose and it particularly limited the transfer of a right of way across the lake so as not to interrupt the navigation of streams.Justice Field agreed with Illinois Central that title to land bordering navigable waters carries with it the right to access these waters and to develop a pier for personal or public use. However, this right extends only to the "navigable point" of the water. Since no evidence had been presented indicating that the railroad's pier and docks extended that far, Justice Field remanded this particular issue back to the lower court.The 1869 act establishing the Illinois Central Railroad Company, granted the company title to a section of the submerged lakebed of Lake Michigan. The state legislature later repealed this piece of legislation. Justice Field posed the question whether the legislature was authorized to transfer title to the submerged lake bed in the first place. It is up to courts to determine on a case-by-case basis whether a state legislature's transfer of rights to submerged lands sufficiently protects the public interest.In this case, Illinois Central was granted unrestricted rights to an enormous, 1,000-acre (4.0km2) section of submerged land, which occupied the entire aquatic area bordering the Chicago harbor. Justice Field found the state can never permanently transfer authority over these submerged lands, but only grant revocable permissions to them. Therefore, the Illinois state legislature's original grant had no effect on the state of Illinois's ultimate authority over the submerged land.Justice Shiras' Dissenting OpinionJustice Shiras agreed that ownership of state lands extends to those lands submerged under its navigable waters; however, Shiras argued that the grant of the submerged lands by the state legislature functioned like any land transfer contract and effectively transferred title to Illinois Central. Shiras pointed out that the act granting the submerged lands expressly denied Illinois Central the rights to resell or transfer the lands or to impair the public right to navigation. Shiras makes it clear that this dissenting opinion does not contradict the point that states cannot transfer control of the public's rights to navigable waters, however, these rights are only violated once Illinois Central acts to obstruct them. To otherwise empower the legislature to revoke legislative acts granting property rights would offend "the right of the citizens to the free enjoyment of their property legally acquired."Background of and so to bedIn the mid-19th century, Chicago was growing rapidly and was becoming increasingly interested in creating an outer harbor at the junction of Lake Michigan and the Chicago River because local currents often resulted in either the formation of sandbars or areas of erosion, increasing congestion and complicating navigation. Then, in 1851, the Illinois Central Railroad Company made an offer to the City of Chicago that in exchange for allowing tracks to be laid along the lake front, the railroad company would pay for and build a breakwater to protect the harbor. Illinois then officially granted 3million acres (12,000km2) of shoreline along Lake Michigan to create a north-south railroad under the state charter titled "An Act to Incorporate the Illinois Central Rail Road Company". This charter gave Illinois Central the authority to "enter upon and take possession of, and use all and singular any lands, streams and materials of every kind." To further confirm their rights to this area, the railroad lobbied the state, and in 1869, the State of Illinois passed the Lake Front Act, granting Illinois Central "appropriation, occupancy, use and control" of a large portion of the harbor. The legislature's goal in passing the act was to bring a new train depot, an outer harbor and better parks to the residents of Chicago. The portion of land stretched from present-day West Randolph Street south to Twelfth Street, and from South Michigan Avenue east into Lake Michigan. However, due to political controversy and poor public opinion of the railroad company, the legislature repealed the Lake Front Act in 1873.Both before and after the repeal, Illinois Central continued to construct tracks, piers and other facilities along the lake front. This construction also included filling in several hundred feet into Lake Michigan to provide land for these new facilities.On March 1, 1883 the Illinois Attorney General filed suit against Illinois Central in order to stop construction on the land known as Lake Park.Procedural historyIn 1883, Illinois filed suit in state court against the Illinois Central Railroad Company, asking the court to determine who possessed title to submerged lands under Lake Michigan adjacent to the Chicago shoreline. Illinois also sought a court order to remove structures the railroad company had constructed over the lakebed, as well as an injunction against Illinois Central continuing this construction. Upon motion, the case was removed to the federal Circuit Court for the Northern District of Illinois. Justice Harlan, then a circuit-court judge, ruled that the state held title to the submerged lands, and therefore had the right to revoke the license granted to Illinois Central in the Act, which Illinois Central had contested. This decision also established that the City of Chicago held title to the land of Lake Park (present day Millennium Park). Illinois Central appealed to the Supreme Court.PartiesThe petitioners were Illinois Central Railroad Company, a corporation created by act of the Illinois State legislature and the city of Chicago, which was added as a party at trial because of its interest in the case. The respondent was the state of Illinois.IssuesWhether the state of Illinois possessed the authority to grant title to its lands submerged by navigable waters.Whether Illinois Central Railroad Company acquired riparian rights to the lake bed immediately adjacent to the lakefront property to which it possessed title.ArgumentsIllinois Centrals argumentsIllinois Central Railroad asserted three arguments in support of their claim on a portion of the lakebed under Lake Michigan. First, Illinois Central argued it had been granted by the state and by city ordinance a 200-foot (61m) wide corridor into the lake to construct a raised railway track, pier and warehouses. Second, Illinois Central argued that they had acquired riparian rights by virtue of their ownership of lands surrounding the lake. Third, the railroad company argued they had received title to a bounded parcel of submerged lakebed from the State of Illinois in 1869.State of Illinoiss argumentIn seeking to enjoin the railroad, the state claimed "title to the bed of Lake Michigan, and exclusive right to develop and improve the harbor of Chicago by the construction of docks, wharves, piers, and other improvements."
Introduction to and so to Bed: Saints and Sinners of and so to Bed
Saints and Sinners of and so to bedSaints and Sinners is a short story collection by Edna O'Brien. Faber and Faber published it in 2011.The collection includes the O'Brien story "Sinners" in which a lonely widow running an isolated rural bed and breakfast overhears the sexual antics of a man, woman and teenage girl who on arrival claim to be couple and daughter - "Then came the exclamations, the three pitches of sound so different -- the woman's loud and gloating, the girl's, helpless, as if she were almost crying, and the man, like a jackass down the woods with his lady loves."Saints and Sinners won the 2011 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award.------Richard Clapton The Definitive Anthology of and so to bedThe Definitive Anthology is the third greatest hits album by Australian rock musician Richard Clapton. The album was released in October 1999 to coincide with his induction into the ARIA Hall of Fame at the ARIA Music Awards of 1999. The album covers songs from his career in chronological order, including two new tracks. The album peaked at number 28 on the ARIA Charts.Talking about the track selection Clapton said "It was not a simple project, as there is so much music and culling it was painful at times. But it was a lot of fun. I looked back at my earlier songs when I was compiling this and I found that the naivete of some of them was really quite cute. I had a lot of fun with it."------Vanessa Woods of and so to bedVanessa Woods (born 1977) is an Australian science writer, author and journalist, and is the main Australian/New Zealand feature writer for the Discovery Channel. A graduate of the Australian National University with a Master's degree in Science Communication, and an author of children's books, she is best known for her work in both the Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo comparing the different cooperative behaviors of bonobos and common chimpanzees. Her mother is of Chinese descent.She is the author of Bonobo Handshake: A Memoir of Love and Adventure in the Congo and It's Every Monkey for Themselves: A True Story of Sex, Love, and Lies in the Jungle.------Disappearance of and so to bedOn 27 September 1966, Redston was sent by his mother to buy ice cream for himself and his brother from the local shops. Redston however sent his brother away and headed to his friend's house, planning to spend the day at the Curtin Tip. After waiting for a short period of time, Redston left the area and was not seen again until his body was discovered the next day.The next day, after a search with police dogs, Redston's body was discovered among the reeds in a creek bed in Curtin. He had been bound, strangled, wrapped in carpet, and then moved to the location.------Azat River of and so to bedThe Azat (Armenian: ) is a river in the Kotayk Province of Armenia. Its source is on the western slope of the Geghama mountains. It flows through Garni, Lanjazat and Arevshat. It flows into the Arax near Artashat. The main purpose of the Azat dam is to serve for irrigation and hydro power generation. Its hazard potential is ranked to be high.The Azat River is known in Armenia for its beauty. It flows for 55 kilometers and has a basin that occupies 572 square kilometers. The Azat passes through the Khosrov State Reserve. In its lower reaches, the river flows into the Ararat valley. The Azat is known for its numerous spectacular waterfalls and its rock choked river bed.------Klonk of and so to bedKlonk is a Czech national nature monument within the landscape park esk kras (Bohemian Karst) which lies in the northern part of the village of Suchomasty, approximately 12 kilometres from Beroun. It is globally recognized as a geologically important location due to the presence of the Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) marking the boundary between Silurian and Devonian periods. The boundary was set based on the first appearance of the graptolite Monograptus uniformis in the bed number 20. The stratotype was ratified on the 8th of February 1972 by the International Union of Geological Sciences in Montreal as the first formally accepted GSSP.Coordinates: 495403N 140340E / 49.90083N 14.06111E / 49.90083; 14.06111------Bull v Hall of and so to bedBull and another v Hall and another UKSC 73 was a Supreme Court of the United Kingdom discrimination case between Peter and Hazelmary Bull and Martin Hall and Steven Preddy. Hall and Preddy, a homosexual couple, brought the case after the Bulls refused to give them a double room in their guesthouse, citing their religious beliefs. Following appeals, the Supreme Court held the rulings of the lower courts in deciding for Hall and Preddy and against the Bulls. The court said that Preddy and Hall faced discrimination which could not be justified by the Bulls' right to religious belief. It was held that people in the United Kingdom could not justify discrimination against others on a basis of their sexual orientation with their religious beliefs.------Geology of and so to bedAppalachian Highlands DivisionPiedmont ProvinceGettysburg-Newark Lowland SectionBrunswick FormationDiabaseAtlantic PlainAtlantic Coastal Plain ProvinceLowland and Intermediate Upland SectionTrenton GravelMost of the path of Falls Creek lies in a bed of igneous rock of diabase formed as an intrusion into the surrounding Brunswick Formation. The diabase consists of dark gray to black rock, mineralogy consists of labradorite and augite. As it flows down the High Falls, it transitions into the Brunswick, laid down during the Jurassic and Triassic and consists of mudstone, siltstone, and shale. Mineralogy includes argillite and hornfels. Lastly, it enters the river lowland known as Trenton Gravel, a bed laid down during the Quaternary, consisting of sand and clay.------San rock art of and so to bedAdditionally, rock painting sites form part of this sacred landscape where the rock art relates to the beliefs and shamanistic ritual performances of San hunter-gatherers of the precolonial era. The site above the mission was declared a National Monument in 1936. It has been abused by visitors who have vandalized the paintings or splashed water to bring out the colours (depositing a film of salts, causing them to fade). The main panel at the site contains remarkable depictions of birds and an unusual winged figure with zigzag legs, believed to represent a shaman or priest who had assumed bird-like form to undertake the journey to the spirit world. Flight is a widespread and recurring metaphor for altered states of consciousness in South African rock art and folklore.------Propagation of and so to bedAt their conception in the early 17th century each such garden was a private communal amenity for the residents of the overlooking houses akin to a garden courtyard within a palace or community. Such community courtyards date back to at least Ur in 2000 BC where two-storey houses were built of fired brick around an open square. Kitchen, working, and public spaces were located on the ground floor, with private rooms located upstairs.The conversion of many during the 20th century into public parks renders those garden squares a subset of town squares, that is those with a garden square heritage. Some remain private they may open intermittently or regularly but many today are open to the public at least during part of every day, serving as small parks.------TV version of and so to bedA sitcom by Screen Gems based on the film appeared on ABC during the 197374 season, starring Anita Gillette, Robert Urich, David Spielberg, and Anne Archer. A 10-year-old Jodie Foster also appeared as Ted and Alice's daughter. (This differed from the film, in that Ted and Alice had a son.)Because of the overt sexual nature of the film when it was released it was rated R much of the humor could not be translated into a network TV project. Thus the characters needed to be substantially "toned down," losing much of the film's edge. The series did poorly and was canceled after only one season.------Last days of and so to bedAfter the enthronement Mar Thoma lived at Puthenkavu (near Chengannur). But soon he moved his headquarters to Kandanad (near Kochi). There he became seriously ill. He did not get time to call a meeting of the church leaders to select his successor. So he invited one of his relatives Thoma Kathanar, to his bed side, laid his hands on him prayed and declared him as Mar Thoma VIII. Two days after this, on 4 July 1809 Mar Thoma VII died and was laid to rest at Kolenchery palli (now known as St. Peter's & St. Paul's Orthodox Church, Kolenchery). The funeral service was conducted by Mar Thoma VIII.------Never Make a Promise of and so to bed"Never Make a Promise" is a number-one R&B song by group Dru Hill, released in 1997. It is the third single from their eponymous debut album. With a lead by Larry "Jazz" Anthony, the single spent four weeks at number one on the US R&B chart and peaked at number seven on the US pop chart. Although it was a hit, sales of the "Never Make a Promise" single were mainly driven by the popular So So Def Remix of their previous hit "In My Bed" only being available on its B-side. This not only explains why the single reached number one, but also why it did so in only its second week on the Billboard R&B chart------Paravakottai of and so to bedParavakkottai is a village in the Mannargudi Taluk of Thiruvarur district, Tamil Nadu, India. It is surrounded by many Rivers, Ponds, Paddy and Banana fields. Paravakkottai consist of many streets like North street, South street, Middle street, Thilagar Street, Main Road street, Saminathan street. The streets are elegantly arranged in such a manner that all the streets end in the river bed. The nearby town to the north is Mannargudi and south is Madukkur. Paravakkottai earns a good amount of foreign money through its globally spread out community. Most families have at least one member working abroad. Most of them are in Singapore only. So this village is also called as "kutty Singapore" (little Singapore)------Notable residents of and so to bedAngharad James, poet, lived in Cwm Penamnen, to the south of the village, most of her life and is buried in Saint Gwyddelan's church.John Jones, Talysarn, Welsh preacher was born in Dolwyddelan.Paul Griffiths, playwright, writer, and theatre critic lived and worked in the village.Rachel Johncock, sprinter lives in the village; she represented Great Britain in the 2012 World Junior Championships in Athletics for the 100m and 4 100 m relay.Baron Gwydyr, the Earl of Ancaster, lived in the house which is now Elen's Castle Hotel.Eigra Lewis Roberts, writer, won two Prose Medals, National Eisteddfod Drama Crown and Medal. She was born in Blaenau Ffestiniog, and now lives in Dolwyddelan.Ellis Pierce, also known as Elis o'r Nant, was from Dolwyddelan.------Amba Aradam Formation of and so to bedThe Amba Aradam Formation is a Cretaceous sandstone formation in Ethiopia. It is up to 200 metres thick, for instance in the Degua Tembien district. As fossils are absent, the age of the Amba Aradam Formation was interpreted based on the age of assumed corresponding sandstones elsewhere in Ethiopia: the Debre Libanos Sandstones in the Blue Nile Basin, and the Upper Sandstone near Harrar in southeast Ethiopia, both of Late Cretaceous age (10066 million years ago). The lithology of the Amba Aradam Formation makes it less suitable for rock church excavation; caves have however been blasted in this formation to serve as headquarters for the TPLF during the Ethiopian Civil War of the 1980s.------So Much to Tell You of and so to bedSo Much to Tell You is a young adult novel by Australian author John Marsden, first published in 1987. It was his debut book. It was instantly successful in Australia and the US, and has since been translated into nine languages and awarded many highly acclaimed literary awards including the Christopher Medal and the Victorian Premier's Award. It was declared the Best Book of the Year by the Children's Book Council, and, accordingly, its author hopes that it will act as a source of inspiration to other teens who have had to overcome trauma and challenges in their lives which have had long-term ramifications.
Knowledge About and so to Bed,Rikuda Potash of and so to Bed
Rikuda Potash of and so to bedRikuda Potash (Hebrew: ; 1906May 15, 1965) was a Polish-born Israeli Yiddish language poet and short story writer. Sholem Asch called her "the Poetess of Jerusalem".Potash was born in Ojcw. Her father Yekutiel Potash was a correspondent for the Yiddish newspaper Unzer Lebn. Her brother Mordekhai Narkiss (18981957) later became director of the Bezalel Museum.Potash's early work was written and published in Polish, but following the Lww pogrom of 1918 she turned to Yiddish. Beginning in 1922 she published a variety of works in Yiddish, including nature poetry, short stories, children's stories, and translations of Polish works. In 1924, she moved to d, which at the time had the Poland's second-largest population of Jews and was a center of modernist experimentation. She married poet Khayim-Leyb Fuks (18971953) and they had a daughter, Avivit, in 1926. She first came to widespread attention after the inclusion of four of her poems in Ezra Korman's Yidishe dikhterins: antologye ("Yiddish Women Poets: Anthology", 1928). Her first collection of poetry, Vint oyf klavishn ("Wind on Keys"), was published in d in 1934. The title refers to the lyre of King David, which, according to Berakhot, hung over his bed and played by itself when the wind blew across it.In 1934, she divorced Fuks and emigrated with Avivit to Jerusalem, where she worked as librarian for the Bezalel Art School and Museum for the rest of her life. She published two more volumes of poetry, Fun Kidron Tol (1952) and Moled iber Timma (1959). Two more books were published posthumously, Lider ("Poems", 1967) and Geslekh fun Yerusholayim ("In the Alleys of Jerusalem", 1968), the latter her only collection of prose, stories about Mizrahii immigrants to Israel and their children.------Filipino Division of and so to bedTulaFirst Prize: Alwynn C. Javier, "Ang Magneto sa Gitna ng Aking Daigdig"Second Prize: Raymund Magno Garlitos, "Nostos at Iba Pang Awit ng Pagtubos"Third Prize: Jing Castro Panganiban, "Ilang Pagsasanay sa Pangungulila"Maikling KwentoFirst Prize: Reynaldo Duque, "Apong Simon"Second Prize: Alvin Yapan, "Bomba"Third Prize: Abdon Balde Jr., "Supay"Futuristic FictionFirst Prize: Ricardo Fernando III, "Bagong Developments Sa Pagbuo Ng Mito Sa Lungsod"Second Prize: Edgar Calabia Samar, "Project: Eyod"Third Prize: Alvin Yapan, "Nostalgia"Maikling Kwentong PambataFirst Prize: Renato Vibiesca, "Tahooieyy!"Second Prize: Mae Astrid Tobias, "Bayong ng Kuting"Third Prize: Alice Mallari, "Hayan Na Si Lolo Sinto"SanaysayFirst Prize: Niles Jordan Breis, "Kung Tawagin Silay Angela Buruka: Sa Alaala ni Angela Manalang-Gloria"Second Prize: Mjolnir Xoce Ong, "Adventures sa Kawatanan ng Rentas Internas"Third Prize: John Iremil Teodoro, "Maikling Talambuhay ng Isang Makatang Ipinaglihi sa Paa ng Manok at Sirena"Dulang May Isang YugtoFirst Prize: Maria Kristine Chynna Roxas, "Traje De Boda"Second Prize: Christian Vallez, "Twenty Questions"Third Prize: Nathaniel Joseph de Mesa, "I Laugh You"Dulang Ganap Ang HabaFirst Prize: No winnerSecond Prize: No winnerThird Prize: Mari Jina Endaya, "Trese: Isang Panayam"Dulang PantelebisyonFirst Prize: Lazaro Torres Jr., "Kasama Sa Bahay"Second Prize: Rolando Salvana, "Ang Buhay Kong Duling"Third Prize: Nita Eden So, "Ay Em Nene"Dulang PampelikulaFirst Prize: Jose Maria Manalo, "Mangha"Second Prize: Rica Leticia Arevalo, "ICU Bed #7"Third Prize: Norman Wilwayco, "Kung Paano Kong Inayos ang Buhok Ko Matapos ang Mahaba-haba Ring Paglalakbay"------Activities of and so to bedMother Meera receives thousands of visitors of all religions for darshan which she conducts in total silence. Her darshan consists of a ritual, where she will touch a person's head, and then look into their eyes. During this process, she reportedly 'unties knots' in the person's subtle system and permeates them with light. She doesn't charge any money for doing so and she will not give lectures. Mother Meera's reported task on Earth was in calling down a dynamic light-force from the Supreme (Paramatman the supreme Self) in collaboration with other saints and divine beings, as she says, making spiritual progress on earth easier. About this light she says:Like electricity, the Light is everywhere, but one must know how to activate it. I have come for that.Through Japa, the mental remembrance of any Divine Name or Mantra, which may be done informally, and whenever convenient, people could open themselves up to this Light. She does not claim to be a guru or have followers. To be connected to her work, people do not have to recognise her. Her teaching is mainly related to Bhakti, that is devotion to God, and in that she accepts all denominations.Mother Meera does not belong to any particular tradition, except for a certain closeness to the work of Sri Aurobindo and the Mother, whom she was reported to have met in their subtle bodies, when she was a child, visiting their Samadhi (grave). She teaches the unity of all religions. Everyone can go their own ways. It is only important to be connected with the light (the personal spiritual role model) every day by praying, reading or meditating.------Mountains of and so to bedThe village is at the south-east corner of the Beinn Eighe National Nature Reserve, centred on the mountain of that name, which includes some surviving areas of natural forest, the majority of which was cut down from the 16th century onwards for iron smelting which was the major industry in the area. A short but steep woodland trail runs through pine forest on the lower slopes of the reserve, giving fine views over Loch Maree and the mountain of Slioch on the other side of the loch. A longer, rougher mountain trail climbs further up the slopes of Beinn Eighe.The area is well known for its spectacular mountain scenery, especially the Torridon Hills which includes such peaks as Beinn Eighe and Liathach. Although many peaks in the North-west highlands exhibit Torridon geology, the Torridon hills are generally considered only to be those in the Torridon Forest to the north of Glen Torridon. Specifically, these are:LiathachBeinn EigheBeinn AlliginBeinn DeargThe Torridon Hills exhibit some of the most dramatic mountain scenery in the British Isles, surpassed in grandeur probably only by the Cuillins of Skye.The landscape around the village is dominated by the Torridonian sandstone, a Precambrian and very old rock formation. Each of the Torridon Hills sits very much apart from each other, and they are often likened to castles. They have steep terraced sides, and broken summit crests, riven into many pinnacles. There are many steep gullies running down the terraced sides. The summit ridges provide excellent scrambling, and are popular with hill walkers and mountaineers. However, like many ridge routes, there are few escape points, so once committed, the scrambler or hillwalker must complete the entire ridge before descent.------Culture of and so to bedThe Baladevjew Temple is located in Kendrapara. A Car Festival or Rath Yatra is held in the month of Ashadha(June/July) every year, the car of Lord Baladevjew is known as Brahma Taladhwaja and considered as the biggest car of its type in whole world. The Gajalaxmi puja on Kojaagari Purnima or Kumar Purnima Durga Pujaat Amruta manohi village is celebrated in the month of October and Kartikeya Puja in November and Maa Kali Puja at Olaver are held each year. Gajalaxmi puja is a big festival here and is celebrated for 7 days. Maa Basanti Durga Puja in Basupur is one of the famous festivals in the region over 80 years. Maa Kali Puja in Olaver is one of the famous festivals in the region. The Oriya sweet dish, Rasabali, originated from Kendrapara. Kendrapara is also known as Tulasi Ksherta (as Tulasi, different from basil tulsi is the wife of Lord Balabhadra) and Gupta Kshetra (Lord Balabhadra wish to stay here secretly). Different types of prasad prepared and used in Baladevjew Temple are Rasabali, Potali Pitha, Magaja Ladoo, Kakaraa, Khaja, Karanji, Chhena Kheeri, Ghanabrata, Dahipakhala, Khiri, Puri etc.Most of the people here are farmers and some do business and some do fishing in the river and the bay of Bengal. growing prawn near sea shore is a profitable business. Many small-scale industries are coming up so people are now getting more opportunity there.One of most popular Kartikaswar Puja held on River bank of Luna at Kalapada Kendrapada. It is also known as Kendrapada Boita Bandhana Utchav ingratiation every year from 2005.------Biography of and so to bedSarah White married Hugh Norman, the son of Hugh Norman (d. 1623) and Agnes Wolcott (b. c. 1579), on October 8, 1639. They had one daughter, Elizabeth, born in 1642, who drowned in a well when she was just 7 years old, on May 28, 1648.Mary Vincent, daughter of John Vincent, 15 years old at the time, married Benjamin Hammon (1621-1703) on November 8, 1648, in Sandwich. Benjamin Hammon had emigrated from London in 1634.1648 is also the year when Sarah White Norman and Mary Vincent Hammon were prosecuted for "lewd behavior with each other upon a bed". Perhaps because Mary was younger than 16 years old, she was only admonished, but Sarah, probably 10 years older, stood trial. Originally, Richard Berry (1626-1681), a neighbor, accused the two women, and one man, Teage Joanes, of sodomy and other unclean practices. Later Berry said he had borne false witness against Joanes, but he did not withdraw what he said against Sarah White Norman. Much later, the same Berry and other men, including Joanes, were prosecuted for homosexuality, and ordered to "part their uncivil living together".Sarah's husband, Hugh Norman, abandoned her and their children, at least two daughters, Phillis and Ann, and moved back to England, at Orchard Portman, near Taunton, wasting all their money and dying in poverty. Mary and her husband reconciled and had a number of children: Samuel (b. 1655), John (1663-1749), Nathan (b. 1670), Benjamin (1673-1747), Rose (d. 1676), Mary (d. young). In 1652 Benjamin Hammond senior was chosen constable of Yarmouth. By 1673 he is documented as a landowner in Sandwich, and in 1675 he became constable there. He moved to Rochester sometime between its founding (as Sippican) in 1679, and 1686, when his son Samuel was admitted freeman there. Benjamin Hammond died in Rochester, Massachusetts, on August 27, 1703, and Mary Hammond died two years later in 1705.------Colonel Joseph Taylor House of and so to bedThe Colonel Joseph Taylor House is a historic house in the city of Cambridge, Ohio, United States. It was the home of one of Cambridge's leading residents in the late nineteenth century, and it has been named a historic site.Designed by Samuel Hannaford, it was the home of Joseph Danner Taylor, a local newspaperman and politician, U.S. Army judge soon after the Civil War, and U.S. Representative. Possessed of a strong mind from young boyhood, Taylor was fondly remembered by his neighbors as a paragon of community virtue,:953 as well as for his unwavering editorial support of the war when so many men quavered or actively sought to subvert the national struggle.:955Taylor's house mixes two related architectural styles, the Queen Anne and the Stick-Eastlake. Built of wood on a stone foundation, the house is topped with a two-part roof: some is slate-covered, while the rest is protected by asphalt. The two-and-a-half-story facade is composed of three distinctive sections: the middle, comprising an elaborate porch with projecting eaves and a smaller sheltered pair of windows on the second story; a plain right side (as seen from the street) with flat walls, a third-floor gable, and a simple window in each story; and a three-story left side dominated by a large bay window on the first and second stories and a prominent overhang on the third. The entire building is covered with a multi-part gabled roof.In 2008, the Taylor House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, qualifying both because of its architecture and because of connection to Joseph Taylor. By that time, it had been converted into a bed and breakfast, the Colonel Taylor Inn.
Knowledge About and so to Bed,Rikuda Potash of and so to Bed
Rikuda Potash of and so to bedRikuda Potash (Hebrew: ; 1906May 15, 1965) was a Polish-born Israeli Yiddish language poet and short story writer. Sholem Asch called her "the Poetess of Jerusalem".Potash was born in Ojcw. Her father Yekutiel Potash was a correspondent for the Yiddish newspaper Unzer Lebn. Her brother Mordekhai Narkiss (18981957) later became director of the Bezalel Museum.Potash's early work was written and published in Polish, but following the Lww pogrom of 1918 she turned to Yiddish. Beginning in 1922 she published a variety of works in Yiddish, including nature poetry, short stories, children's stories, and translations of Polish works. In 1924, she moved to d, which at the time had the Poland's second-largest population of Jews and was a center of modernist experimentation. She married poet Khayim-Leyb Fuks (18971953) and they had a daughter, Avivit, in 1926. She first came to widespread attention after the inclusion of four of her poems in Ezra Korman's Yidishe dikhterins: antologye ("Yiddish Women Poets: Anthology", 1928). Her first collection of poetry, Vint oyf klavishn ("Wind on Keys"), was published in d in 1934. The title refers to the lyre of King David, which, according to Berakhot, hung over his bed and played by itself when the wind blew across it.In 1934, she divorced Fuks and emigrated with Avivit to Jerusalem, where she worked as librarian for the Bezalel Art School and Museum for the rest of her life. She published two more volumes of poetry, Fun Kidron Tol (1952) and Moled iber Timma (1959). Two more books were published posthumously, Lider ("Poems", 1967) and Geslekh fun Yerusholayim ("In the Alleys of Jerusalem", 1968), the latter her only collection of prose, stories about Mizrahii immigrants to Israel and their children.------Filipino Division of and so to bedTulaFirst Prize: Alwynn C. Javier, "Ang Magneto sa Gitna ng Aking Daigdig"Second Prize: Raymund Magno Garlitos, "Nostos at Iba Pang Awit ng Pagtubos"Third Prize: Jing Castro Panganiban, "Ilang Pagsasanay sa Pangungulila"Maikling KwentoFirst Prize: Reynaldo Duque, "Apong Simon"Second Prize: Alvin Yapan, "Bomba"Third Prize: Abdon Balde Jr., "Supay"Futuristic FictionFirst Prize: Ricardo Fernando III, "Bagong Developments Sa Pagbuo Ng Mito Sa Lungsod"Second Prize: Edgar Calabia Samar, "Project: Eyod"Third Prize: Alvin Yapan, "Nostalgia"Maikling Kwentong PambataFirst Prize: Renato Vibiesca, "Tahooieyy!"Second Prize: Mae Astrid Tobias, "Bayong ng Kuting"Third Prize: Alice Mallari, "Hayan Na Si Lolo Sinto"SanaysayFirst Prize: Niles Jordan Breis, "Kung Tawagin Silay Angela Buruka: Sa Alaala ni Angela Manalang-Gloria"Second Prize: Mjolnir Xoce Ong, "Adventures sa Kawatanan ng Rentas Internas"Third Prize: John Iremil Teodoro, "Maikling Talambuhay ng Isang Makatang Ipinaglihi sa Paa ng Manok at Sirena"Dulang May Isang YugtoFirst Prize: Maria Kristine Chynna Roxas, "Traje De Boda"Second Prize: Christian Vallez, "Twenty Questions"Third Prize: Nathaniel Joseph de Mesa, "I Laugh You"Dulang Ganap Ang HabaFirst Prize: No winnerSecond Prize: No winnerThird Prize: Mari Jina Endaya, "Trese: Isang Panayam"Dulang PantelebisyonFirst Prize: Lazaro Torres Jr., "Kasama Sa Bahay"Second Prize: Rolando Salvana, "Ang Buhay Kong Duling"Third Prize: Nita Eden So, "Ay Em Nene"Dulang PampelikulaFirst Prize: Jose Maria Manalo, "Mangha"Second Prize: Rica Leticia Arevalo, "ICU Bed #7"Third Prize: Norman Wilwayco, "Kung Paano Kong Inayos ang Buhok Ko Matapos ang Mahaba-haba Ring Paglalakbay"------Activities of and so to bedMother Meera receives thousands of visitors of all religions for darshan which she conducts in total silence. Her darshan consists of a ritual, where she will touch a person's head, and then look into their eyes. During this process, she reportedly 'unties knots' in the person's subtle system and permeates them with light. She doesn't charge any money for doing so and she will not give lectures. Mother Meera's reported task on Earth was in calling down a dynamic light-force from the Supreme (Paramatman the supreme Self) in collaboration with other saints and divine beings, as she says, making spiritual progress on earth easier. About this light she says:Like electricity, the Light is everywhere, but one must know how to activate it. I have come for that.Through Japa, the mental remembrance of any Divine Name or Mantra, which may be done informally, and whenever convenient, people could open themselves up to this Light. She does not claim to be a guru or have followers. To be connected to her work, people do not have to recognise her. Her teaching is mainly related to Bhakti, that is devotion to God, and in that she accepts all denominations.Mother Meera does not belong to any particular tradition, except for a certain closeness to the work of Sri Aurobindo and the Mother, whom she was reported to have met in their subtle bodies, when she was a child, visiting their Samadhi (grave). She teaches the unity of all religions. Everyone can go their own ways. It is only important to be connected with the light (the personal spiritual role model) every day by praying, reading or meditating.------Mountains of and so to bedThe village is at the south-east corner of the Beinn Eighe National Nature Reserve, centred on the mountain of that name, which includes some surviving areas of natural forest, the majority of which was cut down from the 16th century onwards for iron smelting which was the major industry in the area. A short but steep woodland trail runs through pine forest on the lower slopes of the reserve, giving fine views over Loch Maree and the mountain of Slioch on the other side of the loch. A longer, rougher mountain trail climbs further up the slopes of Beinn Eighe.The area is well known for its spectacular mountain scenery, especially the Torridon Hills which includes such peaks as Beinn Eighe and Liathach. Although many peaks in the North-west highlands exhibit Torridon geology, the Torridon hills are generally considered only to be those in the Torridon Forest to the north of Glen Torridon. Specifically, these are:LiathachBeinn EigheBeinn AlliginBeinn DeargThe Torridon Hills exhibit some of the most dramatic mountain scenery in the British Isles, surpassed in grandeur probably only by the Cuillins of Skye.The landscape around the village is dominated by the Torridonian sandstone, a Precambrian and very old rock formation. Each of the Torridon Hills sits very much apart from each other, and they are often likened to castles. They have steep terraced sides, and broken summit crests, riven into many pinnacles. There are many steep gullies running down the terraced sides. The summit ridges provide excellent scrambling, and are popular with hill walkers and mountaineers. However, like many ridge routes, there are few escape points, so once committed, the scrambler or hillwalker must complete the entire ridge before descent.------Culture of and so to bedThe Baladevjew Temple is located in Kendrapara. A Car Festival or Rath Yatra is held in the month of Ashadha(June/July) every year, the car of Lord Baladevjew is known as Brahma Taladhwaja and considered as the biggest car of its type in whole world. The Gajalaxmi puja on Kojaagari Purnima or Kumar Purnima Durga Pujaat Amruta manohi village is celebrated in the month of October and Kartikeya Puja in November and Maa Kali Puja at Olaver are held each year. Gajalaxmi puja is a big festival here and is celebrated for 7 days. Maa Basanti Durga Puja in Basupur is one of the famous festivals in the region over 80 years. Maa Kali Puja in Olaver is one of the famous festivals in the region. The Oriya sweet dish, Rasabali, originated from Kendrapara. Kendrapara is also known as Tulasi Ksherta (as Tulasi, different from basil tulsi is the wife of Lord Balabhadra) and Gupta Kshetra (Lord Balabhadra wish to stay here secretly). Different types of prasad prepared and used in Baladevjew Temple are Rasabali, Potali Pitha, Magaja Ladoo, Kakaraa, Khaja, Karanji, Chhena Kheeri, Ghanabrata, Dahipakhala, Khiri, Puri etc.Most of the people here are farmers and some do business and some do fishing in the river and the bay of Bengal. growing prawn near sea shore is a profitable business. Many small-scale industries are coming up so people are now getting more opportunity there.One of most popular Kartikaswar Puja held on River bank of Luna at Kalapada Kendrapada. It is also known as Kendrapada Boita Bandhana Utchav ingratiation every year from 2005.------Biography of and so to bedSarah White married Hugh Norman, the son of Hugh Norman (d. 1623) and Agnes Wolcott (b. c. 1579), on October 8, 1639. They had one daughter, Elizabeth, born in 1642, who drowned in a well when she was just 7 years old, on May 28, 1648.Mary Vincent, daughter of John Vincent, 15 years old at the time, married Benjamin Hammon (1621-1703) on November 8, 1648, in Sandwich. Benjamin Hammon had emigrated from London in 1634.1648 is also the year when Sarah White Norman and Mary Vincent Hammon were prosecuted for "lewd behavior with each other upon a bed". Perhaps because Mary was younger than 16 years old, she was only admonished, but Sarah, probably 10 years older, stood trial. Originally, Richard Berry (1626-1681), a neighbor, accused the two women, and one man, Teage Joanes, of sodomy and other unclean practices. Later Berry said he had borne false witness against Joanes, but he did not withdraw what he said against Sarah White Norman. Much later, the same Berry and other men, including Joanes, were prosecuted for homosexuality, and ordered to "part their uncivil living together".Sarah's husband, Hugh Norman, abandoned her and their children, at least two daughters, Phillis and Ann, and moved back to England, at Orchard Portman, near Taunton, wasting all their money and dying in poverty. Mary and her husband reconciled and had a number of children: Samuel (b. 1655), John (1663-1749), Nathan (b. 1670), Benjamin (1673-1747), Rose (d. 1676), Mary (d. young). In 1652 Benjamin Hammond senior was chosen constable of Yarmouth. By 1673 he is documented as a landowner in Sandwich, and in 1675 he became constable there. He moved to Rochester sometime between its founding (as Sippican) in 1679, and 1686, when his son Samuel was admitted freeman there. Benjamin Hammond died in Rochester, Massachusetts, on August 27, 1703, and Mary Hammond died two years later in 1705.------Colonel Joseph Taylor House of and so to bedThe Colonel Joseph Taylor House is a historic house in the city of Cambridge, Ohio, United States. It was the home of one of Cambridge's leading residents in the late nineteenth century, and it has been named a historic site.Designed by Samuel Hannaford, it was the home of Joseph Danner Taylor, a local newspaperman and politician, U.S. Army judge soon after the Civil War, and U.S. Representative. Possessed of a strong mind from young boyhood, Taylor was fondly remembered by his neighbors as a paragon of community virtue,:953 as well as for his unwavering editorial support of the war when so many men quavered or actively sought to subvert the national struggle.:955Taylor's house mixes two related architectural styles, the Queen Anne and the Stick-Eastlake. Built of wood on a stone foundation, the house is topped with a two-part roof: some is slate-covered, while the rest is protected by asphalt. The two-and-a-half-story facade is composed of three distinctive sections: the middle, comprising an elaborate porch with projecting eaves and a smaller sheltered pair of windows on the second story; a plain right side (as seen from the street) with flat walls, a third-floor gable, and a simple window in each story; and a three-story left side dominated by a large bay window on the first and second stories and a prominent overhang on the third. The entire building is covered with a multi-part gabled roof.In 2008, the Taylor House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, qualifying both because of its architecture and because of connection to Joseph Taylor. By that time, it had been converted into a bed and breakfast, the Colonel Taylor Inn.
Knowledge About and so to Bed: Land Reclamation of and so to Bed
Land reclamation of and so to bedPath-breaking kayal land reclamation projects (agricultural land reclaimed from the Vembanad lake bed), Venad Kayal and Madathil Kayal, are located in the village. This accomplishment opened up a new era for agricultural improvements. This reclamation project was carried out by Pallithanam Mathai Luka of Kainady Village in Kuttanadu. It enabled other large scale reclamation projects in the Vembanadu lake area, making Kuttanadu the rice-bowl of Kerala------Educational trail of and so to bedThe location is a part of 39 kilometers long geological educational trail, which also leads through adjacent areas of importance such as Lom na Kobyle, Zlat k, Koda and others. Individual localities arent necessarily related and it is thus possible to travel only through certain segments of the trail. The trail is suitable even for cyclists and the information boards are in Czech with English abstract..------Good Vibrations (Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch song) of and so to bed"Good Vibrations" is a song by American group Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch. It was released in July 1991 as the lead single from their debut album Music for the People. The song became a number-one hit in the United States, Denmark, Sweden and Switzerland. The single spent twenty weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, its last week rising 40 positions to number 27, but dropped out the following week------Editions and translations of and so to bedEdward Cooke Armstrong (ed.), 'Le Chevalier L'pe: An Old French Poem' (PhD thesis, The Johns Hopkins University, 1897), R. C. Johnston and D. D. R. Owen (eds), Two Old French Gauvain Romances (Edinburgh, 1972)Ross G. Arthur (trans.), Three Arthurian Romances: Poems from Medieval France. Caradoc, The Knight with the Sword, The Perilous Graveyard (London: Dent, 1996), pp.85105------You Gonna Fly of and so to bed"You Gonna Fly" is a song written by Preston Brust, Chris Lucas, and Jaren Johnston, and recorded by Australian country music artist Keith Urban. It was released in October 2011 as fourth and final single from Urban's 2010 album Get Closer. The song reached number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs chart in March 2012.------Demonax of and so to bedDemonax (Greek: , Dmnax, gen.: ; c. AD 70 c. 170) was a Greek Cynic philosopher. Born in Cyprus, he moved to Athens, where his wisdom, and his skill in solving disputes, earned him the admiration of the citizens. He taught Lucian, who wrote a Life of Demonax in praise of his teacher. When he died he received a magnificent public funeral.------Little Hawkeye Conference of and so to bedThe Little Hawkeye Conference is a high school athletic conference in central Iowa. With Oskaloosa dropping from 4A to 3A for the 201011 school year, the conference now has only two 4A schools (Newton & Indianola). The majority of the membership is made up of only 3A schools, the second largest class of schools in Iowa. Although, Norwalk is on the verge of moving up to 4A------Early life of and so to bedMary Moss was born in Somercotes to a rich farmer. While she was still a child, her mother died. When her father remarried, she was sent to live with extended relatives. In Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Mary met Samuel Booth, who soon proposed to her. She refused, possibly because he was sixteen years older than she was, but he was indignant and pursued her until she changed her mind------Jeremias van Rensselaer of and so to bedJeremias van Rensselaer (Amsterdam, 16 May 1632 October 12, 1674) was the third son of Kiliaen van Rensselaer, one of the founders and directors of the Dutch West India Company who was instrumental in the establishment of New Netherland and was created the first patroon of the Manor of Rensselaerswyck. Jeremias van Rensselaer was the acting patroon of the Manor of Rensselaerswyck, and the first of his family to establish himself permanently in America.------Formation of and so to bedWater between Ramsey Island and the Welsh coastline is squeezed over a sea bed that changes height dramatically. During the change of tides this causes the water to flow at a rate of up to 7 knots (13km/h). A set of rocks further constricts the water, especially during higher tides, and this causes hydraulics to form in the shape of glassy standing waves and broken waves (also known as stoppers).------Personnel of and so to bedMike Allsup - guitarGordon DeWitte - organJimmy Greenspoon - keyboardDanny Hutton - vocalsGary Itri - acoustic guitarSkip Konte - keyboardChuck Negron - vocalsGene Page - conductorJack Ryland - bassJoe Schermie - bassFloyd Sneed - percussion, drumsRon Stockert - Fender RhodesPatrick Sullivan - celloCory Wells - vocalsRusty Young - pedal steel------Tourism of and so to bedThe view from the bluff encompasses a significant portion of the Pearl River Basin in Marion County, as well as the eastern portion of the nearby city of Columbia, Mississippi. The land where the bluff is located is privately owned, so hiking is prohibited, but the bluff can be viewed from roadside parking areas along Mississippi Highway 587.------Dolwyddelan of and so to bedDolwyddelan (Welsh pronunciation) (in Victorian times, often spelled Dolyddelen) is a village and community in Conwy county borough, north Wales, on the main A470 road between Blaenau Ffestiniog and Betws-y-Coed. As a community, the population of Dolwyddelan was recorded in the 2001 Census as 427, and 55.8% of those residents could speak Welsh. A slight population increase to 474 was recorded in the 2011 census with the proportion of Welsh speakers falling to 50.8%..------Saint-Julien AOC of and so to bedSaint-Julien is an Appellation d'Origine Contrle (AOC) for red wine in the Bordeaux region, located in the Mdoc subregion. It takes its name from the commune Saint-Julien-Beychevelle and is one of the six communal appellations in Mdoc. A number of classified (Grand Cru Class) Bordeaux estates are located within the appellation.------In popular culture of and so to bedThe Partnach Gorge served as a film location for the 1979 film Nosferatu the Vampyre. In an early montage, the protagonist travels through the wilderness to Count Dracula's castle. Although the film's dialogue refers to the route as the Borgo Pass in the Carpathian Mountains (in accordance with Bram Stoker's novel, Dracula), the footage of the narrow passages and rushing water clearly identifies the location as the Partnach.------Wave Patterns of and so to bedVarious subsurface currents conflict at times, causing bizarre wave patterns. One of the most noticeable of these is the Maelstrom. The word is derived from Nordic words meaning to grind and stream. Essentially, the maelstrom is a large, very powerful whirlpool, a large swirling body of water being drawn down and inward toward its center. This is usually the result of tidal currents------Transport of and so to bedThe easternmost terminus of the docklands extension of the Luas Red Line light rail system is located in the middle of the development. This Luas link to Tallaght connects the Point Village to other transport options, including the DART, suburban rail, Busras, mainline rail, and the future Dublin Metro. The Dublin Port Tunnel southern portal is located nearby.------Track listingPersonnel of and so to bedArt Direction: Xuxa MeneghelDirection: Paulo de BarrosCinematography: Andr HortaProducers: Luiz Cludio Moreira and Mnica MunizMusical production: Ary SperlingProduction Director: Junior PortoProduction assistant: Mariana de AquinoCover and Ente: Felipe GoisSet design: Lueli AntunesCharacters: Bila Bilu,Tutxutxuo, Ratinha Rosa, Ratinha Amarela, Ratinho Azul, Xuxinha and Guto------Hits of and so to bedHits is a greatest hits album by American R&B group Dru Hill. It was released on October 17, 2005 by Def Soul Classics. It features hits like "Tell Me" "In My Bed", "How Deep Is Your Love", "5 Steps", and "Never Make a Promise".It also features Sisq's solo hits "Thong Song" and "Incomplete".------Association with the Maharajah of and so to bedWhile employed with the Attiyara Pohtty one evening, when the Maharajah Marthanda Varma was dining at Attiyara, he noticed Ramayyan who impressed him by dealing with a minor yet significant incident with great sense and intelligence. The pleased Marthanda Varma asked the Attiyara Pohtty to let him take the young boy into his service which being permitted Ramayyan became a servant of the Maharajah of Travancore------Allerston of and so to bedAllerston is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, about 5 miles (8km) east of Pickering. According to the 2001 census, the parish had a population of 309, reducing slightly to 302 at the 2011 Census.The parish church, originally dedicated to St Mary, is now dedicated to St John and is a grade II* listed building.------Track listing of and so to bed"Strange Piece of Music""Party in My Head""What Am I Supposed to Be Doing?""The Happiest Boy""I'm So Lonely""(Brown)""Jesus on Big Brother""For the Love I Have for You""Circus Bear""(Orange)""Swan Song""Deux Cygnes Noirs""Wow Wow's Song (La La La)""(Social Life at the Psychiatric Unit 30.07.77)"------St Bede's Church, Rotherham of and so to bedSt Bede's Church is a Roman Catholic parish church in Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. The Gothic Revival style church, designed by Weightman and Hadfield, is situated on the corner of Station Road and St Bede's Road in Masbrough near the town centre. Built from 1841 to 1842, it was opened eight years before the Restoration of the English hierarchy in 1850..------Distribution and habitat of and so to bedThe Japanese sea lily occurs off the western coast of Japan. It is usually found within the depth range 100 to 150 metres (330 to 490ft). Abundant collection records are available from Sagami Bay and Suruga Bay. It is found attached by its stem to rocks, shells and other hard surfaces, using its cirri to anchor itself into position. It can move across the seabed using its arms but seldom does so.------Further reading of and so to bedMatthiessen, Francis Otto. "Michael Wigglesworth, a Puritan Artist." New England Quarterly (1928) 1#4 pp: 491504. in JSTORMorgan, Edmund S. American Heroes: Profiles of Men and Women Who Shaped Early America (2010) pp 10211Primary sourcesMorgan, Edmund S. The Diary of Michael Wigglesworth, 1653-1657: The Conscience of a Puritan (1970)Wigglesworth, Michael, ed. Ronald A. Bosco. The Poems of Michael Wigglesworth (University Press of America, 1989)------Dove Awards of and so to bedIn 2009, the song was nominated for two Dove Awards: Song of the Year and Pop/Contemporary Recorded Song of the Year, at the 40th GMA Dove Awards. Although the song did not win any of the awards, Chapman took home Artist of the Year and Songwriter of the Year. During the ceremony, Chapman also performed the song and received a standing ovation..------Don Pedro Reservoir of and so to bedDon Pedro Reservoir, also known as Lake Don Pedro, is a reservoir formed by the construction of the New Don Pedro Dam across the Tuolumne River in the Stanislaus National Forest of Tuolumne County, California, United States.The California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment has issued a safe advisory for any fish caught in Don Pedro Reservoir due to elevated levels of mercury and PCBs.------Poetry of and so to bedIn A Threnody Lanigan laments the death of the Akond of Swat.The poem begins:Just as Edward Lear remarked - "Who or why or which or what/is the Akond of Swat", so Lanigan plays with the title more than the event.Similarly in his Dirge of the Moolla of Kotal: Rival of the Akhoond of Swat beginning:------Sparagmite of and so to bedSparagmite (from the Latin sparagma, meaning "fragment") is an arkosic sandstone, greywacke and conglomerate set of beds so named by Jens Esmark in 1829. Deposited in what is now Scandinavia during the Neoproterozoic Era to early Cambrian time, the sparagmite nappes were transported up to several hundred kilometers during the Caledonian collision. Sparagmite is characterized by high feldspar percentages of microcline..------Music, When Soft Voices Die of and so to bed"Music, When Soft Voices Die" is a major poem by Percy Bysshe Shelley, written in 1821 and first published in Posthumous Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley in 1824 in London by John and Henry L. Hunt with a preface by Mary Shelley. The poem is one of the most anthologised, influential, and well-known of Shelley's works.------Mexicans in France of and so to bedMexicans in France refers to Mexicans and their French-born descendants. Paris is the main point of residence for Mexicans, but there are also considerable numbers in Strasbourg and Marseille.The House of Mexico in Paris is one of 37 residences in the Cit Internationale Universitaire de Paris (CIUP) and was created by the governments of Mexico and France in 1953 to host young university students from Mexico and other Hispanic American countries.------Sunday's River Valley Local Municipality of and so to bedSundays River Valley Local Municipality (Afrikaans: Sondagsriviervallei Plaaslike Munisipaliteit) is a local municipality in Sarah Baartman District Municipality, Eastern Cape, South Africa. It has a total population of nearly 70,000 people. This area is one of the key production areas for citrus in South Africa. It also encompasses the Addo Elephant National Park and other significant areas of nature conservation
Knowledge About and so to Bed,Rikuda Potash of and so to Bed
Rikuda Potash of and so to bedRikuda Potash (Hebrew: ; 1906May 15, 1965) was a Polish-born Israeli Yiddish language poet and short story writer. Sholem Asch called her "the Poetess of Jerusalem".Potash was born in Ojcw. Her father Yekutiel Potash was a correspondent for the Yiddish newspaper Unzer Lebn. Her brother Mordekhai Narkiss (18981957) later became director of the Bezalel Museum.Potash's early work was written and published in Polish, but following the Lww pogrom of 1918 she turned to Yiddish. Beginning in 1922 she published a variety of works in Yiddish, including nature poetry, short stories, children's stories, and translations of Polish works. In 1924, she moved to d, which at the time had the Poland's second-largest population of Jews and was a center of modernist experimentation. She married poet Khayim-Leyb Fuks (18971953) and they had a daughter, Avivit, in 1926. She first came to widespread attention after the inclusion of four of her poems in Ezra Korman's Yidishe dikhterins: antologye ("Yiddish Women Poets: Anthology", 1928). Her first collection of poetry, Vint oyf klavishn ("Wind on Keys"), was published in d in 1934. The title refers to the lyre of King David, which, according to Berakhot, hung over his bed and played by itself when the wind blew across it.In 1934, she divorced Fuks and emigrated with Avivit to Jerusalem, where she worked as librarian for the Bezalel Art School and Museum for the rest of her life. She published two more volumes of poetry, Fun Kidron Tol (1952) and Moled iber Timma (1959). Two more books were published posthumously, Lider ("Poems", 1967) and Geslekh fun Yerusholayim ("In the Alleys of Jerusalem", 1968), the latter her only collection of prose, stories about Mizrahii immigrants to Israel and their children.------Filipino Division of and so to bedTulaFirst Prize: Alwynn C. Javier, "Ang Magneto sa Gitna ng Aking Daigdig"Second Prize: Raymund Magno Garlitos, "Nostos at Iba Pang Awit ng Pagtubos"Third Prize: Jing Castro Panganiban, "Ilang Pagsasanay sa Pangungulila"Maikling KwentoFirst Prize: Reynaldo Duque, "Apong Simon"Second Prize: Alvin Yapan, "Bomba"Third Prize: Abdon Balde Jr., "Supay"Futuristic FictionFirst Prize: Ricardo Fernando III, "Bagong Developments Sa Pagbuo Ng Mito Sa Lungsod"Second Prize: Edgar Calabia Samar, "Project: Eyod"Third Prize: Alvin Yapan, "Nostalgia"Maikling Kwentong PambataFirst Prize: Renato Vibiesca, "Tahooieyy!"Second Prize: Mae Astrid Tobias, "Bayong ng Kuting"Third Prize: Alice Mallari, "Hayan Na Si Lolo Sinto"SanaysayFirst Prize: Niles Jordan Breis, "Kung Tawagin Silay Angela Buruka: Sa Alaala ni Angela Manalang-Gloria"Second Prize: Mjolnir Xoce Ong, "Adventures sa Kawatanan ng Rentas Internas"Third Prize: John Iremil Teodoro, "Maikling Talambuhay ng Isang Makatang Ipinaglihi sa Paa ng Manok at Sirena"Dulang May Isang YugtoFirst Prize: Maria Kristine Chynna Roxas, "Traje De Boda"Second Prize: Christian Vallez, "Twenty Questions"Third Prize: Nathaniel Joseph de Mesa, "I Laugh You"Dulang Ganap Ang HabaFirst Prize: No winnerSecond Prize: No winnerThird Prize: Mari Jina Endaya, "Trese: Isang Panayam"Dulang PantelebisyonFirst Prize: Lazaro Torres Jr., "Kasama Sa Bahay"Second Prize: Rolando Salvana, "Ang Buhay Kong Duling"Third Prize: Nita Eden So, "Ay Em Nene"Dulang PampelikulaFirst Prize: Jose Maria Manalo, "Mangha"Second Prize: Rica Leticia Arevalo, "ICU Bed #7"Third Prize: Norman Wilwayco, "Kung Paano Kong Inayos ang Buhok Ko Matapos ang Mahaba-haba Ring Paglalakbay"------Activities of and so to bedMother Meera receives thousands of visitors of all religions for darshan which she conducts in total silence. Her darshan consists of a ritual, where she will touch a person's head, and then look into their eyes. During this process, she reportedly 'unties knots' in the person's subtle system and permeates them with light. She doesn't charge any money for doing so and she will not give lectures. Mother Meera's reported task on Earth was in calling down a dynamic light-force from the Supreme (Paramatman the supreme Self) in collaboration with other saints and divine beings, as she says, making spiritual progress on earth easier. About this light she says:Like electricity, the Light is everywhere, but one must know how to activate it. I have come for that.Through Japa, the mental remembrance of any Divine Name or Mantra, which may be done informally, and whenever convenient, people could open themselves up to this Light. She does not claim to be a guru or have followers. To be connected to her work, people do not have to recognise her. Her teaching is mainly related to Bhakti, that is devotion to God, and in that she accepts all denominations.Mother Meera does not belong to any particular tradition, except for a certain closeness to the work of Sri Aurobindo and the Mother, whom she was reported to have met in their subtle bodies, when she was a child, visiting their Samadhi (grave). She teaches the unity of all religions. Everyone can go their own ways. It is only important to be connected with the light (the personal spiritual role model) every day by praying, reading or meditating.------Mountains of and so to bedThe village is at the south-east corner of the Beinn Eighe National Nature Reserve, centred on the mountain of that name, which includes some surviving areas of natural forest, the majority of which was cut down from the 16th century onwards for iron smelting which was the major industry in the area. A short but steep woodland trail runs through pine forest on the lower slopes of the reserve, giving fine views over Loch Maree and the mountain of Slioch on the other side of the loch. A longer, rougher mountain trail climbs further up the slopes of Beinn Eighe.The area is well known for its spectacular mountain scenery, especially the Torridon Hills which includes such peaks as Beinn Eighe and Liathach. Although many peaks in the North-west highlands exhibit Torridon geology, the Torridon hills are generally considered only to be those in the Torridon Forest to the north of Glen Torridon. Specifically, these are:LiathachBeinn EigheBeinn AlliginBeinn DeargThe Torridon Hills exhibit some of the most dramatic mountain scenery in the British Isles, surpassed in grandeur probably only by the Cuillins of Skye.The landscape around the village is dominated by the Torridonian sandstone, a Precambrian and very old rock formation. Each of the Torridon Hills sits very much apart from each other, and they are often likened to castles. They have steep terraced sides, and broken summit crests, riven into many pinnacles. There are many steep gullies running down the terraced sides. The summit ridges provide excellent scrambling, and are popular with hill walkers and mountaineers. However, like many ridge routes, there are few escape points, so once committed, the scrambler or hillwalker must complete the entire ridge before descent.------Culture of and so to bedThe Baladevjew Temple is located in Kendrapara. A Car Festival or Rath Yatra is held in the month of Ashadha(June/July) every year, the car of Lord Baladevjew is known as Brahma Taladhwaja and considered as the biggest car of its type in whole world. The Gajalaxmi puja on Kojaagari Purnima or Kumar Purnima Durga Pujaat Amruta manohi village is celebrated in the month of October and Kartikeya Puja in November and Maa Kali Puja at Olaver are held each year. Gajalaxmi puja is a big festival here and is celebrated for 7 days. Maa Basanti Durga Puja in Basupur is one of the famous festivals in the region over 80 years. Maa Kali Puja in Olaver is one of the famous festivals in the region. The Oriya sweet dish, Rasabali, originated from Kendrapara. Kendrapara is also known as Tulasi Ksherta (as Tulasi, different from basil tulsi is the wife of Lord Balabhadra) and Gupta Kshetra (Lord Balabhadra wish to stay here secretly). Different types of prasad prepared and used in Baladevjew Temple are Rasabali, Potali Pitha, Magaja Ladoo, Kakaraa, Khaja, Karanji, Chhena Kheeri, Ghanabrata, Dahipakhala, Khiri, Puri etc.Most of the people here are farmers and some do business and some do fishing in the river and the bay of Bengal. growing prawn near sea shore is a profitable business. Many small-scale industries are coming up so people are now getting more opportunity there.One of most popular Kartikaswar Puja held on River bank of Luna at Kalapada Kendrapada. It is also known as Kendrapada Boita Bandhana Utchav ingratiation every year from 2005.------Biography of and so to bedSarah White married Hugh Norman, the son of Hugh Norman (d. 1623) and Agnes Wolcott (b. c. 1579), on October 8, 1639. They had one daughter, Elizabeth, born in 1642, who drowned in a well when she was just 7 years old, on May 28, 1648.Mary Vincent, daughter of John Vincent, 15 years old at the time, married Benjamin Hammon (1621-1703) on November 8, 1648, in Sandwich. Benjamin Hammon had emigrated from London in 1634.1648 is also the year when Sarah White Norman and Mary Vincent Hammon were prosecuted for "lewd behavior with each other upon a bed". Perhaps because Mary was younger than 16 years old, she was only admonished, but Sarah, probably 10 years older, stood trial. Originally, Richard Berry (1626-1681), a neighbor, accused the two women, and one man, Teage Joanes, of sodomy and other unclean practices. Later Berry said he had borne false witness against Joanes, but he did not withdraw what he said against Sarah White Norman. Much later, the same Berry and other men, including Joanes, were prosecuted for homosexuality, and ordered to "part their uncivil living together".Sarah's husband, Hugh Norman, abandoned her and their children, at least two daughters, Phillis and Ann, and moved back to England, at Orchard Portman, near Taunton, wasting all their money and dying in poverty. Mary and her husband reconciled and had a number of children: Samuel (b. 1655), John (1663-1749), Nathan (b. 1670), Benjamin (1673-1747), Rose (d. 1676), Mary (d. young). In 1652 Benjamin Hammond senior was chosen constable of Yarmouth. By 1673 he is documented as a landowner in Sandwich, and in 1675 he became constable there. He moved to Rochester sometime between its founding (as Sippican) in 1679, and 1686, when his son Samuel was admitted freeman there. Benjamin Hammond died in Rochester, Massachusetts, on August 27, 1703, and Mary Hammond died two years later in 1705.------Colonel Joseph Taylor House of and so to bedThe Colonel Joseph Taylor House is a historic house in the city of Cambridge, Ohio, United States. It was the home of one of Cambridge's leading residents in the late nineteenth century, and it has been named a historic site.Designed by Samuel Hannaford, it was the home of Joseph Danner Taylor, a local newspaperman and politician, U.S. Army judge soon after the Civil War, and U.S. Representative. Possessed of a strong mind from young boyhood, Taylor was fondly remembered by his neighbors as a paragon of community virtue,:953 as well as for his unwavering editorial support of the war when so many men quavered or actively sought to subvert the national struggle.:955Taylor's house mixes two related architectural styles, the Queen Anne and the Stick-Eastlake. Built of wood on a stone foundation, the house is topped with a two-part roof: some is slate-covered, while the rest is protected by asphalt. The two-and-a-half-story facade is composed of three distinctive sections: the middle, comprising an elaborate porch with projecting eaves and a smaller sheltered pair of windows on the second story; a plain right side (as seen from the street) with flat walls, a third-floor gable, and a simple window in each story; and a three-story left side dominated by a large bay window on the first and second stories and a prominent overhang on the third. The entire building is covered with a multi-part gabled roof.In 2008, the Taylor House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, qualifying both because of its architecture and because of connection to Joseph Taylor. By that time, it had been converted into a bed and breakfast, the Colonel Taylor Inn.
Knowledge About and so to Bed,Rikuda Potash of and so to Bed
Rikuda Potash of and so to bedRikuda Potash (Hebrew: ; 1906May 15, 1965) was a Polish-born Israeli Yiddish language poet and short story writer. Sholem Asch called her "the Poetess of Jerusalem".Potash was born in Ojcw. Her father Yekutiel Potash was a correspondent for the Yiddish newspaper Unzer Lebn. Her brother Mordekhai Narkiss (18981957) later became director of the Bezalel Museum.Potash's early work was written and published in Polish, but following the Lww pogrom of 1918 she turned to Yiddish. Beginning in 1922 she published a variety of works in Yiddish, including nature poetry, short stories, children's stories, and translations of Polish works. In 1924, she moved to d, which at the time had the Poland's second-largest population of Jews and was a center of modernist experimentation. She married poet Khayim-Leyb Fuks (18971953) and they had a daughter, Avivit, in 1926. She first came to widespread attention after the inclusion of four of her poems in Ezra Korman's Yidishe dikhterins: antologye ("Yiddish Women Poets: Anthology", 1928). Her first collection of poetry, Vint oyf klavishn ("Wind on Keys"), was published in d in 1934. The title refers to the lyre of King David, which, according to Berakhot, hung over his bed and played by itself when the wind blew across it.In 1934, she divorced Fuks and emigrated with Avivit to Jerusalem, where she worked as librarian for the Bezalel Art School and Museum for the rest of her life. She published two more volumes of poetry, Fun Kidron Tol (1952) and Moled iber Timma (1959). Two more books were published posthumously, Lider ("Poems", 1967) and Geslekh fun Yerusholayim ("In the Alleys of Jerusalem", 1968), the latter her only collection of prose, stories about Mizrahii immigrants to Israel and their children.------Filipino Division of and so to bedTulaFirst Prize: Alwynn C. Javier, "Ang Magneto sa Gitna ng Aking Daigdig"Second Prize: Raymund Magno Garlitos, "Nostos at Iba Pang Awit ng Pagtubos"Third Prize: Jing Castro Panganiban, "Ilang Pagsasanay sa Pangungulila"Maikling KwentoFirst Prize: Reynaldo Duque, "Apong Simon"Second Prize: Alvin Yapan, "Bomba"Third Prize: Abdon Balde Jr., "Supay"Futuristic FictionFirst Prize: Ricardo Fernando III, "Bagong Developments Sa Pagbuo Ng Mito Sa Lungsod"Second Prize: Edgar Calabia Samar, "Project: Eyod"Third Prize: Alvin Yapan, "Nostalgia"Maikling Kwentong PambataFirst Prize: Renato Vibiesca, "Tahooieyy!"Second Prize: Mae Astrid Tobias, "Bayong ng Kuting"Third Prize: Alice Mallari, "Hayan Na Si Lolo Sinto"SanaysayFirst Prize: Niles Jordan Breis, "Kung Tawagin Silay Angela Buruka: Sa Alaala ni Angela Manalang-Gloria"Second Prize: Mjolnir Xoce Ong, "Adventures sa Kawatanan ng Rentas Internas"Third Prize: John Iremil Teodoro, "Maikling Talambuhay ng Isang Makatang Ipinaglihi sa Paa ng Manok at Sirena"Dulang May Isang YugtoFirst Prize: Maria Kristine Chynna Roxas, "Traje De Boda"Second Prize: Christian Vallez, "Twenty Questions"Third Prize: Nathaniel Joseph de Mesa, "I Laugh You"Dulang Ganap Ang HabaFirst Prize: No winnerSecond Prize: No winnerThird Prize: Mari Jina Endaya, "Trese: Isang Panayam"Dulang PantelebisyonFirst Prize: Lazaro Torres Jr., "Kasama Sa Bahay"Second Prize: Rolando Salvana, "Ang Buhay Kong Duling"Third Prize: Nita Eden So, "Ay Em Nene"Dulang PampelikulaFirst Prize: Jose Maria Manalo, "Mangha"Second Prize: Rica Leticia Arevalo, "ICU Bed #7"Third Prize: Norman Wilwayco, "Kung Paano Kong Inayos ang Buhok Ko Matapos ang Mahaba-haba Ring Paglalakbay"------Activities of and so to bedMother Meera receives thousands of visitors of all religions for darshan which she conducts in total silence. Her darshan consists of a ritual, where she will touch a person's head, and then look into their eyes. During this process, she reportedly 'unties knots' in the person's subtle system and permeates them with light. She doesn't charge any money for doing so and she will not give lectures. Mother Meera's reported task on Earth was in calling down a dynamic light-force from the Supreme (Paramatman the supreme Self) in collaboration with other saints and divine beings, as she says, making spiritual progress on earth easier. About this light she says:Like electricity, the Light is everywhere, but one must know how to activate it. I have come for that.Through Japa, the mental remembrance of any Divine Name or Mantra, which may be done informally, and whenever convenient, people could open themselves up to this Light. She does not claim to be a guru or have followers. To be connected to her work, people do not have to recognise her. Her teaching is mainly related to Bhakti, that is devotion to God, and in that she accepts all denominations.Mother Meera does not belong to any particular tradition, except for a certain closeness to the work of Sri Aurobindo and the Mother, whom she was reported to have met in their subtle bodies, when she was a child, visiting their Samadhi (grave). She teaches the unity of all religions. Everyone can go their own ways. It is only important to be connected with the light (the personal spiritual role model) every day by praying, reading or meditating.------Mountains of and so to bedThe village is at the south-east corner of the Beinn Eighe National Nature Reserve, centred on the mountain of that name, which includes some surviving areas of natural forest, the majority of which was cut down from the 16th century onwards for iron smelting which was the major industry in the area. A short but steep woodland trail runs through pine forest on the lower slopes of the reserve, giving fine views over Loch Maree and the mountain of Slioch on the other side of the loch. A longer, rougher mountain trail climbs further up the slopes of Beinn Eighe.The area is well known for its spectacular mountain scenery, especially the Torridon Hills which includes such peaks as Beinn Eighe and Liathach. Although many peaks in the North-west highlands exhibit Torridon geology, the Torridon hills are generally considered only to be those in the Torridon Forest to the north of Glen Torridon. Specifically, these are:LiathachBeinn EigheBeinn AlliginBeinn DeargThe Torridon Hills exhibit some of the most dramatic mountain scenery in the British Isles, surpassed in grandeur probably only by the Cuillins of Skye.The landscape around the village is dominated by the Torridonian sandstone, a Precambrian and very old rock formation. Each of the Torridon Hills sits very much apart from each other, and they are often likened to castles. They have steep terraced sides, and broken summit crests, riven into many pinnacles. There are many steep gullies running down the terraced sides. The summit ridges provide excellent scrambling, and are popular with hill walkers and mountaineers. However, like many ridge routes, there are few escape points, so once committed, the scrambler or hillwalker must complete the entire ridge before descent.------Culture of and so to bedThe Baladevjew Temple is located in Kendrapara. A Car Festival or Rath Yatra is held in the month of Ashadha(June/July) every year, the car of Lord Baladevjew is known as Brahma Taladhwaja and considered as the biggest car of its type in whole world. The Gajalaxmi puja on Kojaagari Purnima or Kumar Purnima Durga Pujaat Amruta manohi village is celebrated in the month of October and Kartikeya Puja in November and Maa Kali Puja at Olaver are held each year. Gajalaxmi puja is a big festival here and is celebrated for 7 days. Maa Basanti Durga Puja in Basupur is one of the famous festivals in the region over 80 years. Maa Kali Puja in Olaver is one of the famous festivals in the region. The Oriya sweet dish, Rasabali, originated from Kendrapara. Kendrapara is also known as Tulasi Ksherta (as Tulasi, different from basil tulsi is the wife of Lord Balabhadra) and Gupta Kshetra (Lord Balabhadra wish to stay here secretly). Different types of prasad prepared and used in Baladevjew Temple are Rasabali, Potali Pitha, Magaja Ladoo, Kakaraa, Khaja, Karanji, Chhena Kheeri, Ghanabrata, Dahipakhala, Khiri, Puri etc.Most of the people here are farmers and some do business and some do fishing in the river and the bay of Bengal. growing prawn near sea shore is a profitable business. Many small-scale industries are coming up so people are now getting more opportunity there.One of most popular Kartikaswar Puja held on River bank of Luna at Kalapada Kendrapada. It is also known as Kendrapada Boita Bandhana Utchav ingratiation every year from 2005.------Biography of and so to bedSarah White married Hugh Norman, the son of Hugh Norman (d. 1623) and Agnes Wolcott (b. c. 1579), on October 8, 1639. They had one daughter, Elizabeth, born in 1642, who drowned in a well when she was just 7 years old, on May 28, 1648.Mary Vincent, daughter of John Vincent, 15 years old at the time, married Benjamin Hammon (1621-1703) on November 8, 1648, in Sandwich. Benjamin Hammon had emigrated from London in 1634.1648 is also the year when Sarah White Norman and Mary Vincent Hammon were prosecuted for "lewd behavior with each other upon a bed". Perhaps because Mary was younger than 16 years old, she was only admonished, but Sarah, probably 10 years older, stood trial. Originally, Richard Berry (1626-1681), a neighbor, accused the two women, and one man, Teage Joanes, of sodomy and other unclean practices. Later Berry said he had borne false witness against Joanes, but he did not withdraw what he said against Sarah White Norman. Much later, the same Berry and other men, including Joanes, were prosecuted for homosexuality, and ordered to "part their uncivil living together".Sarah's husband, Hugh Norman, abandoned her and their children, at least two daughters, Phillis and Ann, and moved back to England, at Orchard Portman, near Taunton, wasting all their money and dying in poverty. Mary and her husband reconciled and had a number of children: Samuel (b. 1655), John (1663-1749), Nathan (b. 1670), Benjamin (1673-1747), Rose (d. 1676), Mary (d. young). In 1652 Benjamin Hammond senior was chosen constable of Yarmouth. By 1673 he is documented as a landowner in Sandwich, and in 1675 he became constable there. He moved to Rochester sometime between its founding (as Sippican) in 1679, and 1686, when his son Samuel was admitted freeman there. Benjamin Hammond died in Rochester, Massachusetts, on August 27, 1703, and Mary Hammond died two years later in 1705.------Colonel Joseph Taylor House of and so to bedThe Colonel Joseph Taylor House is a historic house in the city of Cambridge, Ohio, United States. It was the home of one of Cambridge's leading residents in the late nineteenth century, and it has been named a historic site.Designed by Samuel Hannaford, it was the home of Joseph Danner Taylor, a local newspaperman and politician, U.S. Army judge soon after the Civil War, and U.S. Representative. Possessed of a strong mind from young boyhood, Taylor was fondly remembered by his neighbors as a paragon of community virtue,:953 as well as for his unwavering editorial support of the war when so many men quavered or actively sought to subvert the national struggle.:955Taylor's house mixes two related architectural styles, the Queen Anne and the Stick-Eastlake. Built of wood on a stone foundation, the house is topped with a two-part roof: some is slate-covered, while the rest is protected by asphalt. The two-and-a-half-story facade is composed of three distinctive sections: the middle, comprising an elaborate porch with projecting eaves and a smaller sheltered pair of windows on the second story; a plain right side (as seen from the street) with flat walls, a third-floor gable, and a simple window in each story; and a three-story left side dominated by a large bay window on the first and second stories and a prominent overhang on the third. The entire building is covered with a multi-part gabled roof.In 2008, the Taylor House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, qualifying both because of its architecture and because of connection to Joseph Taylor. By that time, it had been converted into a bed and breakfast, the Colonel Taylor Inn.
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An overview of and so to bedJeremias van Rensselaer (Amsterdam, 16 May 1632 October 12, 1674) was the third son of Kiliaen van Rensselaer, one of the founders and directors of the Dutch West India Company who was instrumental in the establishment of New Netherland and was created the first patroon of the Manor of Rensselaerswyck. Jeremias van Rensselaer was the acting patroon of the Manor of Rensselaerswyck, and the first of his family to establish himself permanently in America.New Netherlands of and so to bedIn 1654, he sailed from Amsterdam on the Gelderse Blom ("Gelderland Flower"), to the Dutch colony of New Netherland (present day United States). He returned to Holland by the Beaver, October 28, 1655, and sailed the second time from Amsterdam on the Gilded Otter, shortly after June 14, 1656.In 1658, his older brother Jan Baptist returned to Amsterdam and Jeremias succeeded him as Director of Rensselaerwyck on September 24, 1658. Jeremias was the first of his family to establish himself permanently in America, the remaining sixteen years of his life being devoted to the government of the colony.Manor of RensselaerswyckPursuing the policies begun under the vice-directors, he became a man of great influence among the Indians, and "so attached them to him that they guarded his estates as carefully as they did their own." To the French in Canada he was known as one of the representative and ablest men of the Dutch and English colonies. He had the good judgment to adjust the acute differences with Peter Stuyvesant (1612-1672) which had troubled the administrations of his brother and van Slichtenhorst, and during the brief residue of the Dutch authority in New Netherland was on excellent terms with the governor.In 1661, eight chairs, a bed, a mirror and a cupboard were sent to him from the Dutch Republic.In 1664, Jan Baptist, Elisabeth van Twiller, the widow of Johan, Leonora and Susanna decided to sell all their property in and around Rensselaerswijck to Jeremias. His younger brother Rijckert went to the colony to assist him.On the occasion of the landtsdagh or diet summoned by Stuyvesant early in 1664 to deliberate on the critical condition of the provincethis being the first general representative assembly held within the present state of New Yorkhe served as presiding officer of that body.Province of New YorkAfter the surrender to the English in September 1664, he took the oath to the new government, and the rights and immunities enjoyed by his family in its colony were recognized, though the precise future status of the property was not settled in his time. He desired to obtain a new patent in the name of his family, and, failing in this, was privately advised to move in the matter as an individual (being qualified to hold real estate by virtue of his British citizenship), and so obtained a regrant of Rensselarswyck in his personal name. This counsel he rejected indignantly, saying he was but a coheir, and would not defraud his brothers and sisters. He finally obtained from Governor Andros a patent "to the heirs of Kiliaen van Rensselaer," which, while in a sense only provisional, served all necessary purposes until the manor grant of 1685.SuccessionAs his nephew, Kiliaen van Rensselaer, was still a minor upon Jeremias' death in 1674, Jeremias' younger brother, Nicholas van Rensselaer, succeeded him as Director of Rensselaerwyck until his death in 1678 at which point Kiliaen (Jeremias' son-in-law) became the 4th Patroon.Personal life of and so to bedOn July 12, 1662, Jeremias married Marritje "Maria" van Cortlandt (16451689), daughter of Olaff Stevensz van Cortlandt and Annetje (ne Loockermans) van Cortlandt. Maria was the sister of Stephanus Van Cortlandt and Jacobus Van Cortlandt, both of whom served as Mayor of New York City. Together Jeremias and Maria were the parents of seven children, including:Kiliaen Van Rensselaer (16631719), who became the 5th patroon and 2nd Lord of Rensselaerswyck Manor in 1687. He married his first cousin, Maria Van Cortlandt (daughter of Stephanus Van Cortlandt), in 1701.Johannes van Rensselaer, who died without issue.Anna van Rensselaer (16651723), who married her first cousin, Kilaen Van Rensselaer, the 4th patroon. After his death in 1687, she married William Nicoll, the Speaker of the New York General Assembly.Hendrick van Rensselaer (16671740), who married Catharina Van Brugh (16651730), daughter of prominent fur and timber trader Johannes Pieterse Van Brugh, in 1689.Maria van Rensselaer (1673-1713), who married Pieter Schuyler (16571724), the 1st mayor of Albany and acting Governor of the Province of New York.Jeremias died in Rensselaerswyck on October 12, 1674. He left a voluminous correspondence, together with a minute chronicle of events in America, under the title of the "New Netherland Mercury". His great industry and methodical habits have been remarked upon by many writers. His widow died in January 1689.
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